business

June 2000
By Henry S. Kenyon

A major collaboration between communications industry giants produces cutting-edge devices.

Next-generation signal processor technology for wireless communications is the focus of a unique research center. The Atlanta-based StarCore Technology Center combines the pooled assets of Motorola Incorporated’s semiconductor products sector and Lucent Technologies’ microelectronics group.

June 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

Staggering statistics paint a rosy picture, but observers wonder about sustainability.

June 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

Second-generation hosting centers reinforce e-business reliability.

Companies that have made their millions—and billions—in the guts and brains of information technology products are spreading their techno-tentacles into e-commerce through the gap between operation and application services. They are not leaving the world of hardware behind but rather are ensuring that their companies will continue to prosper by infusing their technical expertise into the space between the transmitter and the receiver of e-commerce messages.

June 2000
By Henry S. Kenyon

Programs capable of pattern recognition in personnel employment data add teeth to background checks.

A set of software and algorithms developed to identify criminal activity in the gambling industry is now available to the federal government to help detect employee fraud and collusion. The system correlates data from a variety of sources to shed light on questionable personal relationships and transactions. In the federal sector, this system’s potential uses cover internal security, background investigations and intelligence gathering.

September 2000
By Michael A. Robinson

Seeing the big picture allows graphics generators to zoom in on a niche market.

For Anthony K. Robbins, building a billion-dollar business is about more than high performance. Indeed, as the president of SGI’s recently launched federal business subsidiary, success depends on generating images such as realistic battle scenes and high-resolution relays from outer space.

By Robert K. Ackerman

 
It’s easier than you think; large and small companies do it all the time.

Many would-be contractors sabotage their own bids with sloppy processes and mistaken notions that leave government acquisition officials no choice but to reject them for a contract award. These mistakes can run the gamut from firms’ attempts to pull the wool over the eyes of government officials to honest errors that bidders do not realize are hurting their cause.

January 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

Improved sales to drive industry in 2005, but new technologies challenge established pricing schemes.

After several years of depressed revenues, the telecommunications industry is poised to recover in 2005, experts say. Rebounding from the historic lows of the past several years, the equipment manufacturing sector can expect robust growth while gains for services will remain modest. But storm clouds loom on the horizon as emerging technologies such as broadband and voice over Internet protocol threaten to radically change traditional service carrier arrangements.

January 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is using RFID technologies to monitor the integrity of seals on shipping containers and to scan electronic manifests to determine their contents.
Logistics management capability poised for widespread use.

March 2001
By Michael A. Robinson

Aggressive marketing strategy focuses on distinct markets.

It is easy to understand why Gene Colabatistto might be tempted to get by on image. After all, ever since his company launched its first sensor-laden satellite in 1986, the international Spot system has captured and delivered millions of images of Earth—from the sands of the Sahara to the expanse of the Golden Gate Bridge.

June 2001
By Michael A. Robinson

Company helps federal agencies join electronic revolution.

If necessity is the mother of invention, then Linda Gooden can qualify as an expert on both.   

Ever since 1790, inventors who wanted to protect their intellectual property against possible theft or exploitation have filed their patent applications pretty much the same way—they filled out a form on paper.

January 2002
By Maryann Lawlor

Companies seek best ways to support employee members of the National Guard and Reserve.

Despite a shaky economy, businesses are contributing to homeland security and the war against terrorism by backing their workers who are guardsmen or reservists. Although it is still too early to determine how an extensive call-up may affect human resources, many firms are researching their legal requirements in terms of pay, benefits and re-employment. Several are then going beyond the mandatory to the extraordinary to ensure that their employees can serve their country without worrying about their families or civilian jobs.

February 2002
By Michael A. Robinson

An acquisition campaign gives way to an internal focus.

It is very rare that the experiences of one company can provide a snapshot of what has happened to the Internet sector, the U.S. economy and the technology industry in general.           

But in October 1999, when journalists, industry analysts and their initial public offering (IPO)-hungry colleagues on Wall Street said the Internet had ushered in an era of boundless economic vistas, a photograph of John Chambers, chief executive officer of Cisco Systems, San José, California, ran on the cover of the “new economy’s” magazine, Business 2.0.

January 2002
By Henry S. Kenyon

Public and private sectors ponder new ways to do business.

U.S. government and business organizations are re-evaluating their communications network design and resiliency following the September 11 terrorist attacks. Planners are now emphasizing dispersed, redundant, military-style systems that can rapidly retrieve and update lost data or switch to alternate transmission modes to maintain connectivity.

October 2002
By Michael A. Robinson

A retired Air Force general plays a critical role in a commercial network-centric approach.

In warfare, as in chess, victory often depends on the ability to foresee the opponent’s next move. So, it seems more than a little appropriate that Lt. Gen. Carl G. O’Berry, USAF (Ret.), a chess enthusiast, is now vice president of a company that is helping the United States develop an integrated battlespace designed to redefine modern warfare.

April 2003
By Sharon Berry

International telecommunications networks expand, foster cultural convergence.

The rapid evolution of the Internet and other telecommunications networks has begun to eliminate national boundaries and geographic separation among countries. Scientific methods used to study international information flows and resulting globalization indicate a correlation between the flows and major political and economic changes over time.

April 2003
By Dane Warf

Large-scale government outsourcing requires both control and flexibility.

A multimillion-dollar U.S. Air Force project that streamlines financial information sharing processes is coming to fruition using an approach that facilitates responsiveness to requirements changes and incrementally delivers capabilities. The system goes into production this month after two years in development.

July 2003
By Michael A. Robinson

Information systems group takes lead in company traditionally known for tanks, turrets and transmissions.

Ken Dahlberg sometimes likens his burgeoning high-technology business to a high-speed ride at a Disney theme park. No, he is not being sarcastic—far from it.

In just six years, Dahlberg’s information systems and technology (IS&T) group at General Dynamics has become one of the largest and most respected outfits selling technology services to the nation’s defense and civilian agencies.

March 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

 

Israeli designed and manufactured tactical military communcations and control systems now have new entree into the European market.

Consolidation is a key to highly competitive business environment.

December 16, 2013
By Maryann Lawlor

In an open letter to decision makers in Washington, D.C., last week, several superpowers of the Web called for global government surveillance reform. Citing this year’s revelations of the U.S. government’s collection of private citizens’ information, these companies “believe it is time for the world’s governments to address the practices and laws regulating government surveillance of individuals and access to their information.” Wait a minute. Don’t these firms collect information about citizens all the time? Aren’t efforts for national security just as important as the quest to send Web viewers only the advertisements they want to see?

November 15, 2013
By Maryann Lawlor

A revolution quietly erupted in October. On the University of Chicago campus, more than 80 innovators came together to discuss their ideas about how to solve some of the military’s most vexing problems. Not blind to the chain-of-command bureaucracy in which they operate, these pragmatic dreamers passionately moved forward in spite of it, because the Defense Entrepreneurs Forum (DEF) conference provided a place for in-person networking and commiserating, brainstorming and bracing one another up.

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