Twitter

June 29, 2017
By Adam B. Jonas

On the eve of last year’s U.S. presidential election, two computational social scientists from the University of Southern California published an alarming study that went largely unnoticed in the flood of election news. It found that for a month leading up to the November vote, a large portion of users on the social media platform Twitter might not have been human.

The users were social bots, or computer algorithms built to automatically produce content and interact with people on social media, emulating them and trying to alter their behavior. Bots are used to manipulate opinions and advance agendas—all part of the increasing weaponization of social media.

January 12, 2015
By Sandra Jontz
Screen shot of CENTCOM's Twitter page, which had been hacked January 12, 2015.

Update: As of January 14, the Twitter and YouTube accounts for CENTCOM are back online.

The Twitter and YouTube accounts for the U.S. Central Command, the Defense Department branch responsible for operations in the Middle East and Afghanistan, were hacked Monday by sympathizers of the Islamic State militant group, prompting U.S. officials to suspend the accounts and launch yet another round of investigations into a cybersecurity breach.

CENTCOM’s Twitter feed included an ominous post that read: “AMERICAN SOLDIERS, WE ARE COMING, WATCH YOUR BACK. ISIS.”

July 31, 2012
By Rachel Eisenhower

Encrypt tweets and send them to select groups or individuals with the scrambls app for the iPhone or iPad. The app gives you total control over your online privacy on Twitter. Simply tap tweets to instantly encrypt the text before it is sent to the cloud. Only select individuals defined at scrambls.com can read the posts. Your selected contacts need the app or the browser plug-in, and they will see the scrambled posts as clear text. Just change the group or individuals permitted to read a post based on the level of privacy you want to achieve.

February 24, 2012
By Beverly Schaeffer

Given some of the most shocking emergency events of the past decade, whether on school campuses, severe weather conditions, or the overall climate of hyper-awareness in the United States following 9/11, the ability to provide real-time public warnings has become a huge priority. The current Emergency Alert System (EAS), and its predecessor, the Emergency Broadcast System, or EBS, date back to 1951. But present-day capabilities, brought about by advanced satellite and other systems technologies-including the Internet and social media tools-provide the very capabilities necessary to deliver an alert with time enough to spare to enable proactive measures.