facial recognition

April 29, 2016

A group of University of Maryland (UMD) researchers has developed an algorithm that can not only detect a face, but also simultaneously determine the gender and pose, and extract fiducial, or reference, points.

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) has provided funding and support for the invention, which has been dubbed HyperFace. The algorithm simultaneously detects faces; finds facial landmarks, including eye center, nose tip, etc.; estimates the head pose; and recognizes the person’s gender from any real-world images and videos, Rama Chellappa, UMD chair of electrical and computer engineering, said in a written announcement.

September 28, 2015
By George I. Seffers
To determine facial examiners' skills in matching whether faces in two images are the same person, researchers pushed the boundaries by adding inverted images and photos with backgrounds to the standard face-matching of closely cropped head shots.

Trained forensics examiners from the FBI and law enforcement agencies worldwide were far more accurate in identifying faces in photographs than nonexperts and even computers, according to a new assessment. The assessment provides “the first strong evidence that facial forensic examiners are better at face recognition than the rest of us,” Jonathon Phillips, a face recognition researcher at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), said in a written announcement.

April 16, 2012
By George Seffers

The U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has selected MorphoTrust, Billerica, Massachusetts, as the prime contractor for its new Universal Enrollment Service (UES), the company recently announced. UES will transition multiple programs into a consolidated service with convenient locations for individuals requiring enrollment and registration for programs serviced by TSA. The checks include the capture of biometric (facial pictures and fingerprints) and biographic data to ensure that individuals seeking access to critical segments of the nation's transportation system, infrastructure, or sensitive materials do not pose a threat to national security.