science and technology

February 2, 2010
By Katie Packard

Science nerds, gather 'round! Every Friday afternoon, you can get your science on with Science Friday, a weekly talk show that focuses on timely science topics. But now the show has launched an application that lets fans of the show access podcasts and videos any day of the week. Future versions that feature more social networking options are in the works. The free app works on iPhones and iPod Touch. For more information or to download the app, visit the iTunes store.

January 6, 2010
By Katie Packard

"Armed with Science: Research and Applications for the Modern Military" is a weekly podcast from the U.S. Defense Department that highlights the importance of science and technology to modern military operations and the DOD. Interviews with scientists, administrators and operators are conducted to inform listeners about the cutting-edge research and development happening within the defense community.

January 1, 2015
By James Kadtke and Linton Wells II

Technology developments increasingly have strategic effects. They help determine winners and losers in economies, how nations interact and how our children think. The pace of innovation is accelerating while becoming more globalized. A number of prestigious studies have raised serious concerns that this increasing competition will result in a loss of U.S. technological pre-eminence. These trends are particularly worrisome for future U.S. military capabilities, which have been based on technological dominance for decades.

December 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Ariel Tolentino, a sensor surveillance operator, conceals two cameras on the ground during an operational check at Camp Lejeune, N.C. The U.S. Army Research Laboratory is developing isotope-powered batteries that could allow unattended ground sensors to continue operating for far greater periods that today’s chemical batteries will allow.

U.S. Army researchers are developing batteries powered by radioisotopes that could last for decades, or longer. The long-lived power sources could lighten the logistics load on the battlefield and energize sensors and communications nodes for extended periods, offering enhanced situational awareness and opening up operational options for warfighters that do not exist today.

December 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Sandia National Laboratories employees Jon Salton (l) and Steve Buerger put the Urban Hopper through its paces.

Acrobatic vehicle seeks urban combat deployment.

August 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

 

All-electric cars and trucks can recharge off the grid overnight without overwhelming power plants and distribution systems.

Multigeneration upgrade of electrical transmission system is driven by government-industry partnership and cutting-edge technologies.

April 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Staff Sgt. Andre Murnane, ARNG, became the first National Guard Special Forces soldier to jump with a prosthesis on August 1, 2010.

Future prostheses could open new doors for injured soldiers, including an option to return to their units.

July 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Technicians launch an aerostat containing a High Antennas for Radio Communications, or HARC, payload. An optical fiber tether carries an analog ground radio signal to its corresponding antenna aboard the aerostat, providing greatly increased transmission range.

December 2009
By Henry S. Kenyon

 

Recent advances in fuel cell technology offer the potential for small tactical unmanned aerial systems (UASs) to operate up to 24 hours. The Experimental Fuel Cell (XFC) UAS being developed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) currently can fly for up to six hours and carry a variety of sensor payloads.

April 2009
By Henry S. Kenyon

March 2009
By Maryann Lawlor

November 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

October 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

April 2008
By Rita Boland

 
A U.S. Army staff sergeant fingerprints an Iraqi policeman prior to entering his information into a database in the police station. Biometrics information such as fingerprints allows U.S. forces to positively identify people through unique personal characteristics.
New technologies link tools and personnel to find enemies through one-of-a-kind modalities.

June 2007
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

June 2007
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

June 2007
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

June 2007
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

June 2007
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

June 2007
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

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