cyber

March 6, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Lt. Gen. Scott Berrier, Army deputy chief of staff, G-2, speaks at the AFCEA Army Signal Conference.

Cloud computing, big data and cyber are among the capabilities that pose a major threat to U.S. forces, said Lt. Gen. Scott Berrier, Army deputy chief of staff, G-2.

“If you’re a threat actor out there, probably a little bit of investment in these areas is going to go a long way to make life very difficult for your adversaries,” Gen. Berrier told the audience at the AFCEA Army Signal Conference in Springfield, Virginia.

March 2, 2018
By Maryann Lawlor
Image courtesy of BlackBerry

As enterprises mobilize business processes, more and more sensitive information passes through and resides on mobile devices. BlackBerry, a virtual grandfather in the handheld devices world, offers chief information officers (CIOs) an idea of what they’re up against when attempting to ensure the security of data flying through cyberspace.

March 1, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
A soldier with the 1st Infantry Division provides security during exercise Allied Spirit VII in Hohenfels, Germany. In the future, the trees surrounding the soldier may be used as networked sensors if work underway at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) bears fruit.

Native plant life could join traffic cameras, motion detectors and enemy sensor systems as future sources of battlefield information if the U.S. Army Research Laboratory has its way. The laboratory is applying the Internet of Things approach to theater command, control, communications, computers and intelligence as it plans to equip soldiers and their leaders with vital knowledge from nontraditional information sources, and it is leaving no stone—or crop—unturned in its efforts.

March 1, 2018
Posted by George I. Seffers
A Marine radios in after contact with a simulated enemy during a training exercise in Shizuoka, Japan. The Defense Department has mandated a new software architecture standard for tactical radios. Credit: Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Aaron Henson

The Department of Defense Joint Enterprise Standards Committee today has listed the Software Communications Architecture (SCA) version 4.1 as a mandated tactical radio standard in the department’s Information Technology Standards Registry (DISR) and retired SCA version 2.2.2.

The SCA is an open architecture framework that defines a standard way to instantiate, configure and manage waveform applications running on a radio hardware platform. The SCA decouples waveform software from its platform-specific software and hardware, facilitates waveform software reuse and minimizes development expenditures.

March 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Credit: Niyazz/Shutterstock

Where some see challenges, others see opportunities. It sounds like a motivational poster, but that is exactly how researchers at the National Security Agency view the Internet of Things, or the IoT.

“We approach IoT a little differently than everybody else. Everybody’s talking about all the security problems. That’s certainly fair, but we look at IoT as an opportunity in terms of the security goals we can accomplish,” says George Coker, chief, Information Assurance Research Group, National Security Agency (NSA).

March 1, 2018
By Bridgit Griffin
Photo Credit: Mopic/vs148/Shutterstock

The military tackles many challenges in its cyber ecosystem—a diverse group of human users, processes and technologies and their interactions—by striving for uniformity across its hardware, software and operating systems. But standardization also can create large holes in the cyber environment, weakening defenses and contributing to successful cyber attacks. Coming at cybersecurity from a different angle could leverage differences in favor of network defenders.

Without a doubt, system consistency has its benefits. Using the same operating systems, applications, switches, routers and other components across networks reduces complexity and lowers the cost of equipment maintenance as well as defense.

March 1, 2018
By Jonathan Hobbs
Photo Credit: and4me/Shutterstock

Artificial intelligence is one of the most influential forces in information technology. It can help drive cars, fly unmanned aircraft and protect networks. But artificial intelligence also can be a dark force, one that adversaries use to learn new ways to hack systems, shut down networks and deny access to crucial information.

March 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
The E-6B Mercury has been dubbed the most dangerous aircraft in the world because of its capability to command and control nuclear intercontinental ballistic missiles. The next-generation Airborne Launch Control System will be capable of launching both Minuteman III and Ground-Based Deterrence System missiles. Credit: Josh Plueger

The next-generation airborne missile control system being developed by the U.S. Air Force will take advantage of modern communications and electronics systems such as software-defined radios to provide a number of capabilities, including improved cybersecurity.

March 1, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Credit: Shutterstock/Bruce Rolff

Part of the Office of Naval Research’s efforts in command, control, communications and computers is to provide key analytical tools to planners, analysts and commanders swamped by data. To that end, the office, known as the ONR, is conducting basic and applied research in applications that will cut maneuver planning time, expand access to data, enhance analytical processing and improve predictions. The tools are meant to improve decision making across antisubmarine warfare, integrated air and missile defense, electromagnetic maneuver warfare, and expeditionary and integrated fires missions.

February 28, 2018
By Beverly Cooper
Mike Engle of Bastille Networks, the winner of AFCEA DC Chapter’s shark tank, shows how everyday devices, such as remote controls, used at home or in business or government, could provide access points for hackers. Phoot Credit: Michael Carpenter

Many cybersecurity methods and products are available to protect wireless networks from intrusion, but security concerns go well beyond the risks to Wi-Fi. The combination of legacy wireless systems and Internet of Things vulnerabilities number in the hundreds, and all radio frequency protocols are at risk.  

February 20, 2018
By Maryann Lawlor
The volume and variety of information that adversaries are surreptitiously collecting and analyzing from U.S. information systems requires new ways to detect enemies. Credit: Shutterstock

The billions of bits and bytes that make government services, information sharing and even shopping easier also open the doors for adversaries to gather intelligence that aids their nefarious pursuits. AFCEA International’s Cyber Committee has published a white paper that describes several ways big data analytics can help cybersecurity analysts close those doors or at least shrink the gap and reduce vulnerabilities.

February 21, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
Photo Illustration. Credit: Shutterstock/Dmitri Ma

Five cyber technology firms will vie for top honors as a six-month series of shark tank competitions reaches its climax on February 27 in Arlington, Virginia. These efforts are part of an ongoing attempt by AFCEA to apply the principle of the popular venture capital television show to bring new technologies to the attention of government organizations seeking vital solutions. Following the cyber technology shark tank, AFCEA will host another shark tank at its Small Business Innovation Summit on May 1.

February 20, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Government mobile devices are still vulnerable to cyber attacks, a recent report says. Photo credit: Shutterstock/Georgejmclittle

Mobile devices used by federal employees continue to be susceptible to malicious cyber attacks. Email accounts, stored documents, microphones and cameras on the devices still present avenues of entry for bad actors.

Complicating the matter are conflicting governmental compliance policies, misconceptions of security measures and naivety about the exact risks, a recent survey concluded. Many agencies are still ill equipped to handle these incidents. Moreover, even if policies are in place, employees do not always follow them, and intrusions still happen, according to the report, "Policies and Misconceptions: How Government Agencies are Handling Mobile Security in the Age of Breaches," prepared by San Francisco-based Lookout Inc.

February 13, 2018
Posted By George I. Seffers

Russia, Iran and North Korea are testing more aggressive cyber attacks against the United States and partner nations, according to the annual Worldwide Threat Assessment of the U.S. Intelligence Community delivered to Congress today by Dan Coats, director of national intelligence.

“The use of cyber attacks as a foreign policy tool outside of military conflict has been mostly limited to sporadic lower-level attacks. Russia, Iran and North Korea, however, are testing more aggressive cyber attacks that pose growing threats to the United States and U.S. partners,” the report states.

February 1, 2018
By Nicola Whiting
Credit: Mopic/Issarawat Tattong/Shutterstock

Advances in automated cyber weapons are fueling the fires of war in cyberspace and enabling criminals and malicious nation-states to launch devastating attacks against thinly stretched human defenses. Allied forces must collaborate and deploy best-of-breed evaluation, validation and remediation technologies just to remain even in an escalating cyber arms race.

February 1, 2018
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
The Joint Force Headquarters Department of Defense Information Network is fully operational, DOD reports. The network defense headquarters spent three years improving capabilities and building capacity to be able to secure and defend the military’s global network. DOD U.S. Strategic Command photo by Adam Hartman, of Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Allshouse using an intrusion detection system aboard the USS Ronald Reagan.

In the U.S. Cyber Command, the part of the cyber force that defends Defense Department networks, systems and vital information is fully up and running, the DOD reported.

The Joint Force Headquarters (JFHQ) Department of Defense Information Network (DODIN) reached readiness after three years of building its capacity and capabilities to secure, operate and defend the DODIN, according to a DOD statement. To achieve full operational capability, JFHQ-DODIN participated in a number combatant command exercises and managed daily network operations to address and counter “significant” cyber threats, DOD said. The unit also deployed its six cyber protection teams to support high-priority military operations.

February 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
Ultimately, lessons learned and technologies developed under the Next Generation Cyber Infrastructure Apex program will benefit other critical infrastructure industries, such as oil and gas.

Within the next 12 months, a fledgling program at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security will likely begin transitioning cybersecurity technologies to the finance sector in an effort to shore up the nation’s critical infrastructure. Technologies developed under the program ultimately could be made available to other sectors.

February 1, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
 The European Union Agency for Network and Information Security, or ENISA, plays a collaborative role to bring Europe together to improve cybersecurity.

Europe is taking on several socio-technological initiatives, including developing a digital single market and tackling consumer financial services reform. Add the need to balance privacy concerns and safeguards across 28 member countries of the European Union, and it may seem like a tall order for policy makers to help strengthen information security.

Enter the European Union Agency for Network and Information Security, the European Union’s cybersecurity agency known as ENISA. The agency, founded in 2004, equips the European Union (EU) to prevent, detect and respond to cybersecurity problems.

February 1, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
The distinctive collegial nature of universities makes them susceptible to cyber attacks, experts say. Credit: Jorge Salcedo/Shutterstock

Although universities can be part of larger cyber attacks as unwitting victims like any other organization or enterprise, the institutions are distinguished by a collegial nature that renders them vulnerable. Academia has a more open atmosphere and a mindset of research and collaboration, making universities an enticing cyber target even for adversaries such as nation-states

February 1, 2018
By James R. Rutherford and Gregory B. White
A proposed new cyber kill chain model modifies the previous one by adding an intelligence-gathering step as well as a step for execution of an attack and exfiltration of information. Credit: Denis Semenchenko/Shutterstock

Understanding the cyber kill chain and disrupting it could effectively defend against the most recent generation of cyber attacks. By scrutinizing the time and effort hackers invest in scoping out potential targets, network defenders can take advantage of several opportunities to block system access or, at the very least, drive up the cost, making attempts unappealing.

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