cyber

August 23, 2017
By Wes Caldwell
The U.S. government endeavors to deliver capabilities in a more responsive, agile manner, says Wes Caldwell, chief technology officer, Polaris Alpha.

Many U.S. government sectors, including defense, intelligence, public safety, cybersecurity and space, have seen a recent shift toward embracing new technologies and methodologies for delivering capabilities in a more responsive, agile manner.

The ecosystem of technologies that is driving this innovation is diverse to say the least. The foundation of this ecosystem is the underlying IT infrastructure. The evolution of hyperconverged infrastructure is maximizing the density of computing power, random-access memory and storage in these modern data centers, making it easier and more cost effective for providers to leverage and deploy applications and solutions.

August 22, 2017
By Joe Kim
The Internet of Things is a rising tide presenting major cybersecurity challenges.

The U.S. Defense Department is diving in and investing heavily to leverage the benefits provided by the burgeoning Internet of Things (IoT) environment.

August 18, 2017
Kimberly Underwood
Cyber attacks in the United States usually pass though universities or susceptible third-party infrastructure, explains Kevin Mandia, CEO of FireEye, a cybersecurity company.

The governments of Iran, North Korea, Russia and China are responsible for 90 percent of attacks on U.S. government agencies and private companies, said a leading cybersecurity expert at a recent conference. Most attacks come in the form of spear-phishing or email-related breaches.

August 15, 2017
By Kimberly Underwood
Lt. Gen. Vincent R. Stewart, USMC, director, Defense Intelligence Agency, speaks at the Department of Defense Intelligence Information System 2017 Worldwide Conference.

To Lt. Gen. Vincent R. Stewart, USMC, director, Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), modern warfare is a cognitive battle. To be successful, warfare must strive to control information.

In part, war is still a violent clash between hostile forces, with each force trying to impose their will on the other, the general said. Warfighting may still look like two armies crashing into one another on the battlefield.

“[This] nature of warfare hasn’t changed,” he stated. “War remains an active force to compel an adversary, nothing less.”

August 11, 2017
By Kimberly Underwood
Members of the Army National Guard, Air National Guard, Army Reserve and civilian agencies prepare to engage in cyber attacks as part of the recent Cyber Shield 17 exercise at Camp Williams, Utah. The cyberthreat’s borderless nature is bringing together experts from several nations at this year's Department of Defense Intelligence Information System (DoDIIS) Worldwide Conference in St. Louis.

The menacing threat of cyberwarfare is pulling together international military leaders in an effort to combat global electronic attacks.

Commanders from key military intelligence posts—including allied commanders from the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom—will tackle the seemingly unconstrained risks from cyber criminals at an upcoming forum hosted by the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA). The DIA’s Department of Defense Intelligence Information System (DoDIIS) Worldwide Conference will be held August 14-16 in St. Louis.

August 10, 2017

Cybersecurity solutions company Comodo has launched a new research service called Comodemia for university, government and nonprofit educators and researchers. It gives users access to the Comodo Threat Intelligence Laboratory's cybersecurity data repository, one of the largest in the world.

Comodo's threat data comes from millions of endpoints in more than 220 countries. In the first quarter of this year, the lab detected and cataloged more than 25 million malware incidents. By the second quarter, the total grew to 97 million incidents as the company expanded its research program.

August 10, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Maj. Gen. (P) Bruce Crawford, USA, the Army’s chief information officer/G-6, speaks at TechNet Augusta.

The network the Army has is not the network it needs to confront the changing face of warfare, says Maj. Gen. (P) Bruce Crawford, USA, who took over as the service’s chief information officer/G-6 nine days ago.

Gen. Crawford told the AFCEA TechNet Augusta audience the service confronts a confluence of strategic circumstances, with several major efforts all coming together at the same time. Those circumstances include the evolution of the threat, global instability that creates greater demand for ground forces, the rapid pace of technology evolution, the speed at which decisions must be made on the battlefield and emerging doctrines.

August 10, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Panelists discuss network modernization at TechNet Augusta 2017.

U.S. Army officials who play various roles in modernizing the network say doing so offers multiple benefits, including saving money, improving cybersecurity and offering greater flexibility on behalf of warfighters.

The officials made the comments while serving on a network modernization panel on the final day of the AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2017 conference.

August 9, 2017
By George I. Seffers

Lt. Gen. Mark Bowman, USA (Ret.), former director of command, control, communications and computers/cyber for the Joint Staff, paints a dire picture of future warfare. The next war, he says, will begin with wave after wave of cyber and electronic warfare attacks that our nation is not prepared for. Although the Army is making strides in training the cyber electromagnetic activities (CEMA) force, the service may not be able to address all scenarios in a training environment.

August 8, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Lt. Gen. Paul Nakasone, USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command, speaks at TechNet Augusta 2017.

On the multi-domain battlefield of the future, U.S. forces can expect to see more robots, pilotless ships and planes, and driverless convoys, as well as cyber and other game-changing capabilities, said Lt. Gen. Paul Nakasone, USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command.

Gen. Nakasone made the comments during the afternoon keynote address at AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2017 in Augusta, Georgia.

“We are witnessing a fundamental change and transformation in the character of war," he said. “This transformation is being driven by technology and demographics, socioeconomic and political changes.”

August 8, 2017
By George I. Seffers

The Army’s first doctrine for fighting in the cyberspace and electronic warfare domains already is changing the way the service operates, said Maj. Gen. John B. Morrison Jr., USA, commander, Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Gordon, told the AFCEA TechNet Augusta audience in Augusta, Georgia.

August 8, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Maj. Gen. John B. Morrison Jr. (l), commander, Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Gordon, speaks at TechNet Augusta 2017.

Army officials have multiple pilot projects in the works to help define formations that will integrate cyber electromagnetic activities (CEMA).

According to Maj. Gen. John B. Morrison, Jr., USA, commander, Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Gordon, the Army has initiated one pilot project with the Army Pacific Command and is seeking to begin another within the continental United States to better define formations that will integrate cyber, electronic warfare, signal and intelligence capabilities.

August 8, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Army command posts that take 72 hours or systems that require a doctorate degree to operate, are not effective on the battlefield, says a corps commander preparing to deploy to the combat theater.

Lt. Gen. Paul Funk II, USA, the commander of III Corps, which is preparing for war, called for a network with simplicity as a core requirement.

August 8, 2017
Northeastern University is developing a system that will help you plug leaks of your private information.

Northeastern University will develop a system that organizations and individuals can use to audit and control personally identifiable information leaks from connected devices. The research team will investigate how to use machine learning to reliably identify the information in network flows and will develop algorithms that incorporate user feedback to adapt to the constantly changing landscape of privacy leaks.

August 1, 2017

NAO Cyber Veterans LCC, Arlington, Virginia, is being awarded $26,992,500 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract, resulting from solicitation N00189-17-R-0021, that will include terms and conditions for the placement of firm-fixed-price task orders to provide a variety of information technology support and analytical services in support of the U.S. Fleet Cyber Command Navy Authorizing Official Directorate. The contract will include a five-year base ordering period and six-month option period, which if exercised, the total value of this contract will be $30,000,000. Work will be performed in Suffolk, Virginia (80 percent); and Arlington, Virginia (20 percent). Work is expected to be completed by August 2022.

August 1, 2017
By George I. Seffers
The Army is well on its way to modernizing networks, including moving toward cloud computing, mobile devices and data center consolidation, and fielding the Home Station Mission Command Center.

The U.S. military must adopt a software-defined network to improve agility, flexibility and interoperability with international partners while keeping pace with technological changes, says Lt. Gen. Robert Ferrell, USA (Ret.), former Army chief information officer/G-6.

Owning every piece of hardware is no longer necessary or feasible, says the general, who retired in May. “This legacy environment that we have that is now hardware-based is not going to cut it,” he asserts.

A software-defined network offers a number of benefits, but getting there is no easy task, Gen. Ferrell indicates. “The software-defined network is the way to go, but that’s going to take some time to move in that direction,” he says.

August 1, 2017
By Robert K. Ackerman
A soldier with the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade sets up cyber tools at the National Training Center as part of the U.S. Army’s cyber electromagnetic activities (CEMA) initiative led by Army Cyber Command. The service is consolidating electronic warfare and cyber training and operations at Fort Gordon, Georgia, facilities to integrate all aspects of the disciplines.

The U.S. Army is consolidating major electronics disciplines in an approach that brings education and operations under a single umbrella. This confluence extends to physical plants as well as organizational charts. For example, the Cyber Center of Excellence at Fort Gordon, Georgia, is co-located with its operational counterpart to meld the identities of theory and practice.

August 1, 2017
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence is developing a set of common definitions to unify descriptions of cyberthreats used by different elements of the intelligence community. The effort seeks to bridge differences among various segments of the community when it comes to assessing these threats and reporting them to government organizations and industry. A common vernacular will help generate a common threat picture that can serve government and industry alike, experts agree.

July 27, 2017
By Richard Thieme

The mind of society is the battlefield in the current global struggle for geopolitical domination. The uses of soft power dominate in this battle and information warfare is the name of the game—not “cyber war” in all the ways it has been described but the influence and ultimately control of individual minds that, like cells in a body, make up the Mind of Society. Then control is used as leverage to achieve objectives that are often hidden.

June 29, 2017
By Sandra Jontz
U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley, USA, visits soldiers serving with the cyber electromagnetic activities (CEMA) support to corps and below (CSCB) team, 780th Military Intelligence Brigade, in May at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Chuck Burden, USA

The U.S. Army is serious about the narrative that it is serious about cyber. The service has put its organizational architecture on the line by prioritizing the newest warfighting domain while converging it with long-extant but re-emerging combat disciplines, a senior leader says.

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