Defense Operations

September 15, 2014

Honeywell International Incorporated, Aerospace Defense & Space, Albuquerque, New Mexico, is being awarded a $15,711,691 modification to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N00019-13-C-0048) for the procurement of 197 advanced multi-purpose displays for the F/A-18E/F and EA-18G aircraft. This modification includes 80 5x5 FWD displays, 75 5x5 AFT displays and 8x10 displays, 52 FWD 5x5 displays, 48 5x5 AFT displays and 24 8x10 displays for the U.S. Navy, and 28 5x5 FWD displays, 27 5x5 AFT displays and 18 8x10 displays for the government of Australia. This contract combines purchases for the U.S.

September 15, 2014

Technique Solutions Inc., Stafford, Virginia, was awarded a $25 million indefinite- delivery/indefinite-quantity, firm-fixed-price contract for the entire spectrum of equipment and services associated with the Cyber Network Defense mission and information assurance support. Funding and work location will be determined with each order, with a completion date of Sept. 14, 2019. Army Contracting Command, Key West, Florida, is the contracting activity (W912PX-14-D-0002).

September 15, 2014

KEYW Corp., Hanover, Maryland, has been awarded a $38 million indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for research and development. Contractor will assist the Layer Sensor Exploitation Division at the Air Force Research Laboratory in developing new command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems to exploit existing sensors of all kinds. Some examples of exploitation include target recognition, tracking, fusion, sensor management (autonomy) and registration. Exploitation research is shifting from permissive to contested environments.

September 11, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The Online Show Daily: Day 3

The final day of AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014 kicked off with a solemn remembrance of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks that rocked the nation. The conference then, necessarily, moved on to the future.

September 15, 2014
By Maryann Lawlor

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is seeking information from small businesses as potential sources to provide cyber-related support services; to conduct activities; and to create products to improve the U.S. Defense Department's cyber systems. Specifically, the agency's omnibus indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract will support the U.S. Cyber Command's ability to operate resilient, reliable information and communication networks; counter cyberspace threats; and assure access to cyberspace.

September 15, 2014

BAE Systems Information Solutions Inc., McLean, Virginia (W91W4-14-D-0001); Booz Allen Hamilton Inc., McLean, Virginia (W911W4-14-D-0002); CACI Technologies Inc., Manassas, Virginia (W911(W4-14-D-0003); DynCorp International LLC, McLean, Virginia (W911W4-14-D-0004); Invertix Corp., McLean, Virginia (W911W4-14-D-0005); Lockheed Martin Integrated Systems Inc., Bethesda, Maryland (W911W4-14-D-0006); ManTech Mission, Cyber and Technology Solutions Inc., Falls Church, Virginia (W911W4-14-D-0007); Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Cyber Solutions Division Inc., Chantilly, Virginia (W911W4-14-D-0008); Six3 Intelligence Solutions Inc., McLean, Virginia (W911W4-14-D-0009); Sotera Defense Solutions Inc., Herndon, Virginia (W911W4-14-D-0010); and SRA

September 11, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The Defense Information System Agency (DISA) had been identified as the Defense Department’s cloud broker, but that was rescinded just last week, reported Lt. Gen. Mark Bowman, USA, director, command, control, communications and computers/cyber and chief information officer, Joint Chiefs of Staff.

"People can do a business case analysis and decide where they want to go to get their cloud support, if someone can figure out the secret sauce on how to get it cheaper. It has to be provided to the right security standards, and it will have to be checked,” Gen. Bowman stated, while speaking at AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014.

September 10, 2014
George I. Seffers

Mission success in the cyber arena, especially in a constrained budget environment, requires both cooperation and innovation, but military and industry officials speaking at AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014 say they are not yet seeing enough of either.

Maj. Gen. Stephen Fogarty, USA, the new commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence, Fort Gordon, initiated the discussion, saying that cyber is “inherently joint,” and warning against stovepiped systems and information for different mission areas, such as cyber, signal and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. The Army, he said, has to cooperate with the other services, the Department of Defense, the National Security Agency, industry and multinational partners.

September 11, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Many Army soldiers are receiving new vehicles and new tactical communications systems, but often those systems are so complex soldiers have difficulties setting up and taking down their tactical networks. The issue limits mobility on the battlefield because units hesitate to move knowing it can take hours to re-establish network communications, said Lt. Gen. Patrick Donahue, USA, the new deputy commanding general, U.S. Army Forces Command.

September 11, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Senior military leaders will try next week to hash out differences on the command and control (C2) of the Joint Information Enterprise, or JIE, said Lt. Gen. Mark Bowman, USA, director, command, control, communications and computers/cyber and chief information officer, Joint Chiefs of Staff. Gen. Bowman made the remarks while addressing the audience at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014 conference, Augusta, Georgia.

September 10, 2014
George I. Seffers

Although the U.S. Defense Department and the military industry are feeling the effects of constrained budgets, they have not yet been forced to find truly innovative solutions, Mark Bigham, chief innovation officer for Raytheon Intelligence and Information Services, told the AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014 audience.

Bigham quoted Winston Churchill as saying that Americans will always do the right thing after they’ve exhausted all other alternatives. He also cited another Churchill quote: "Gentlemen, we have run out of money, now we have to think."

September 10, 2014
George I. Seffers

In his farewell address, President Dwight Eisenhower coined the phrase "military industrial complex" to describe the relationships between the military, Congress and industry. That complex no longer exists, according to Tom Davis, a former vice president for General Dynamics. Davis made the comments during an industry panel at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014 conference in Augusta, Georgia.

September 10, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The cyber era requires partnerships and information sharing across the agencies, industries and nations, said Maj. Gen. Stephen Fogarty, USA, the new commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence, Fort Gordon, during a keynote address at the AFCEA TechNet 2014 Augusta conference, Augusta, Georgia.

September 10, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden single-handedly shocked the U.S. intelligence community by leaking reams of information to the news media, but the insider threat is much more widespread, said Maj. Gen. Stephen Fogarty, USA, the new commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Gordon, Georgia.

“Who would imagine one person could have as much impact on this nation as he did,” Gen. Fogarty said, referring to Snowden. “And we were not prepared for that. We were not looking for that. That’s an asymmetric attack that occurred, and it’s happening every single day.”

September 9, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. Army is standing up a cyber brigade and considering a cyber branch, which has some questioning the future of the service's Signal Corps, but the Signal Corps will survive, Lt. Gen. Robert Ferrell, USA, the service’s chief information officer, said during a luncheon keynote speech at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014 conference, Augusta, Georgia. “The Signal Corps will be enduring. It will not be going away,” Gen. Ferrell said. “You’re still going to be required to build, operate and defend the network.

September 10, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. Army is building a Cyber Center of Excellence at Fort Gordon, Georgia, and it will not come cheap, warned Maj. Gen. Stephen Fogarty, USA, the center’s new commanding general.

September 9, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. Army may at some point need to allow soldiers to conduct offensive cyberwarfare at the brigade combat team level, according to a panel of chief warrant officers speaking at AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014, Augusta, Georgia.

September 9, 2014
By George I. Seffers

U.S. Army officials struggled during AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014 in Augusta, Georgia, to discuss the future of cyber operations when much of that future is currently unknowable, in large part because no one knows the full effects or challenges of emerging technologies.

September 9, 2014
George I. Seffers

Sometimes, cyber warriors will have to pick and choose what to protect, because, “It’s increasingly clear we can’t protect everything,” said Lt. Gen. Edward Cardon, USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command, while addressing the AFCEA TechNet Augusta audience in Augusta, Georgia.

September 9, 2014
George I. Seffers

U.S. Army officials are laboring to define what the force will look like in 2025. But technologically speaking, it is hard to define anything beyond the next two or three years, said Lt. Gen. Edward Cardon, USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command, during AFCEA TechNet Augusta held Sept. 9-11, Augusta, Georgia.

Pages