Army Technologies

July 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Magazine

August 2011
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

August 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

 

A U.S. Army soldier uses the new Joint Capabilities Release tracking and messaging software, which is an upgrade to the Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below (FBCB2) situational awareness system. The Army is speeding upgrades and new enabling technologies to the field to exploit existing networking capabilities.

August 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Fort Belvoir Garrison Commander Col. John J. Strycula, USA, right, and Command Sgt. Maj. Gabriel Berhane, USA, left, drive a new fire engine through a ribbon, opening the Fort Belvoir North Area’s new Emergency Services Center in December 2010. Photo by Travis Edwards, U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Belvoir.

July 2010
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Pvt. Ginger Lamere, USA, generator mechanic, Company B, Division Special Troops Battalion, 1st Armored Division, reattaches generator hoses and wires after the new engine is installed. The generator’s motor had to be replaced to meet soldiers’ power demands at Camp Liberty.

July 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance On-The-Move (C4ISR OTM) vehicles and Program Manager Warfighter Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T) configuration items prepare to roll out for a mobile assessment of the 2013 Mobile Brigade Combat Team architecture.

July 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

 

A mine resistant ambush protected vehicle, or MRAP, is equipped with a stronger suspension to handle the rugged terrain of Afghanistan. The speed with which the MRAP was developed and deployed offers opportunities as well as challenges as the Army prepares to review its acquisition process.

July 2010
By Henry S. Kenyon, SIGNAL Magazine

 

A mix of hardware and software, the IBCS consists of servers, radios, workstations and virtual systems designed to provide warfighters with a unified picture of the airspace above a battlefield.

Network-centric architecture will allow commanders to access any sensor or weapon any time.

June 2010
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr., SIGNAL Magazine

 

Lt. Gen. Steven W. Boutelle, USA (Ret.), Army chief information officer (CIO)/G-6, looks over Kabul, Afghanistan, from a plateau above the city.

Clear battlefield picture emerges from modern information technology for audio, visual, data.

August 17, 2009
By Rita Boland

Soldiers can access instructions as well as read blogs, participate in the forum and ask experts questions electronically.

August 17, 2009
By Robert K. Ackerman

 

U.S. Army soldiers fire their M-240B machine gun at night. The need to speed new information technologies to warfighters in Afghanistan and Iraq is changing the way the Army procures new equipment.

The network is the message as the Army learns communications architecture design on the move.

August 17, 2009
By Henry S. Kenyon

August 17, 2009
By Henry S. Kenyon

August 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

August 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

August 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Army staff sergeant communicates with other forces while another soldier provides security during a mission in Iraq. Technologies introduced into Iraq and Afghanistan are changing the Army’s LandWarNet.
Technologies sent to Southwest Asia return to compel changes.

August 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
Two U.S. Army soldiers radio a report on the discovery of improvised explosive devices near Mahmudiya, Iraq. The need to extend greater benefits of the network down to the individual soldier level has compelled the Army to field technologies as soon as they present a coherent capability.
But that activity gives way to more measured progress.

August 2007
By Maryann Lawlor

 
U.S. Army tactical operations centers are one communications hub in current operations. The service is introducing integrated systems to ensure that stovepipes do not get in the way of mission effectiveness.
Small changes making a big difference in moving U.S. Army forward.

August 2007
By Rita Boland

 
Commanders and other dismounted soldiers can use the Commander’s Digital Assistant (CDA) Version 5 to improve situational awareness as well as to share and receive other battle command information.
Soldiers leave the vehicles behind but take the capabilities with them.

August 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The goal of the U.S. Army’s BigDog program is to develop four-legged robots capable of following soldiers across any kind of terrain. Roughly the size of a large dog or small mule, the robot is intended to carry several hundred pounds of supplies and equipment to lighten troops’ loads in combat.
Quadrupedal packbot pushes boundaries of locomotion technology to tread where other machines cannot.

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