Marine Corps Technologies

June 12, 2013
By Rita Boland

Cyberwarfare is a primary concern for the U.S. Marine Corps as it continues its rebalance toward the Asia-Pacific region. With the growing involvement of cyber in every operation along with specific concerns of virtual attacks from large nations in the region, emphasis on the new domain is becoming increasingly important.

May 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers

U.S. Navy and Marine Corps officials describe the K-MAX unmanned cargo helicopter as having met or exceeded requirements in Afghanistan, but they also report that the Marines have not yet developed requirements for the system to become a program of record and say they are unsure what effect sequestration will have on the system.

April 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Declining defense funds and the rise of China may hinder strategic rebalancing efforts.

Whatever the threat; wherever the conflict; whatever the mission; the future U.S. military largely will be defined by forced budget constraints. The ongoing fiscal crisis, haunted by the twin specters of sequestration and continuing resolution, will have a greater say in shaping the future force than either adversaries or advances in weapon technologies.

April 1, 2013
By Rita Boland
A radio operator for Combat Logistics Battalion-31, 31st Expeditionary Unit (MEU) communicates with the command element during a mass casualty evacuation exercise in Japan.

Looking past the alligators close to the boat, scientists prepare for the wars of tomorrow.

Distributed operations are the future of the U.S. Marine Corps, and its premier science and technology organization is laser focused on the capabilities to make such missions a success. Enabling communications for mobile troops across long distances is a priority as battles continue in Afghanistan while the focus shifts toward more maritime environments. Success will give lower echelons better access to command and control, enhancing the fight in any theater.

April 1, 2013
By Max Cacas
MARSOC Marines, above, prepare to board CH-47 Chinook helicopters as part of a two-day presence patrol with Afghan Commandos in Farah province.

After a special operations deployment, handling state-of-the-art communications technology tops the list.

Back from a nearly year-long deployment to Afghanistan, the 1st Marine Special Operations Battalion already is working to apply lessons learned to training for the next deployment. As the battalion prepares for its next mission, it is reflecting on what its Marines learned about how they train, how their equipment worked and how they will prepare themselves for the future.

April 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers
A modernized and fully digitized unmanned aerial system could be performing vital missions over the Asia-Pacific region in the coming years. The upgraded Shadow system fielded by the U.S. Marine Corps could potentially play a major role in the region.

The upgraded RQ-7 could play a significant role in the Asia-Pacific region.

The U.S. Marine Corps could potentially begin fielding newly upgraded RQ-7 Shadow systems as early as next year, according to experts. The new version of the combat-proven aircraft is fully digitized, improves interoperability, can be teamed with manned aircraft and provides intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance data to a broader range of warfighters, including manned aircraft crews. The upgraded system is intended to serve as an interim capability until the Marine Corps can field a larger, more capable unmanned aircraft.

February 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

West 2013 Online Show Daily, Day 3

January 31, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman
John Smart, president of the Acceleration Studies Foundation, tells the keynote luncheon audience that dramatic change is evolutionary and inevitable.

West 2013 Online Show Daily, Day 2

Quote of the Day: “How can you help me make the least-dumb decisions quicker?”—Terry Halvorsen, chief information officer (CIO) for the Department of the Navy, requesting cyber security solutions from industry

January 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

West 2013 Online Show Daily, Day 1

Quote of the Day:“’Flat’ is the new ‘up’ in this defense budget environment.”— Robert O. Work, undersecretary of the Navy

The military services are facing potentially crippling constraints if sequestration takes place in March. Defense officials foresee the likelihood of draconian budget cuts being imposed that will cripple the force just as it is being counted on to assume new strategic missions. In most cases, the services will have to choose to sacrifice some capabilities so that others will remain part of the force. In worse-case scenarios, the U.S. military may be unable to meet its obligations when a crisis emerges.

January 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

The shift of U.S. power to the Asia-Pacific will not be successful without an infusion of new technology and a dedicated effort to defeat a wide range of adversaries. The new strategic emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region poses a new set of challenges, mandating solutions that run the gamut from technological capabilities to cultural outreach and diplomacy.

On the military side, direct challenges range from dealing with cyberspace attacks to providing missile defense in a large-scale conflict. On the geopolitical side, centuries of conflict and confrontation among neighbors must be overcome if a region-wide security environment enabling economic growth is to be implemented.

December 1, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman
U.S. Marines communicate digitally over a network. The Next Generation Enterprise Network, or NGEN, will take a new approach to networking yet evolve from the existing Navy Marine Corps Intranet.

The program may be revolutionary, but its product is evolutionary.

Despite its sea-change approach to acquisition, the U.S. Navy’s Next Generation Enterprise Network program is being designed to evolve from its predecessor, the Navy Marine Corps Intranet, in bids submitted by the two teams vying for the multibillion-dollar contract. The two bidders are focusing their efforts on the transition between the two networks, which is a process that will take several years.

November 14, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

Existing forward-deployed U.S. military elements may be learning a new definition of the phrase as Pacific forces adjust to a new regional emphasis. The rebalancing that represents a new strategy for the Asia-Pacific region will be altering force structures that already represent forward deployments.

The U.S. Navy never left the forward deployment of its forces, said Rear Adm. Patrick Driscoll, USN, deputy commander and chief of staff, U.S. Pacific Fleet. Speaking at a panel in TechNet Asia-Pacific 2012 in Honolulu, Hawaii, the admiral allowed that forward deployment is essential for the force to be able to operate with an effective presence in the vast multinational region.

March 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Marines in Afghanistan radio their patrol’s security element and observe a reconnaissance robot’s camera feed on a laptop. Cybersecurity professionals around the Marine Corps strive to ensure the confidentiality, availability and integrity of the information provided through Marines’ networks at all times in all locations.

March 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

A team of Marines from Marine Air Support Squadron 2 and Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 152 test the Marine Air-Ground Task Force aerial pallet system/special airborne response system (MAPS/SABIR) while in flight over Okinawa.

Help from above aims to save lives on the ground by offering onsite capabilities.

March 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

  

MRAP All Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV) staff vehicle and an M2C2 PoP vehicle undergo testing at Yuma.

 
The Marines use commercial components to extend mobile capabilities to  remote battlefields.

March 2012
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

 

The U.S. Marine Corps Common Aviation Command and Control System (CAC2S) will help direct Marine Corps aviation activities in Afghanistan.

A once-troubled U.S. Marine Corps aviation program now is headed to the combat theater.

March 2011
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

March 2011
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Magazine

 

"Not only are the Infantry Immersion Trainers our newest training capabilities, they are also our knowledge base for creating mixed reality, immersive training environments."

March 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Sgt. Sean Cain, USMC, with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, performs a radio check during a security patrol in Afghanistan.

Top information technology officer tackles network challenges for the Corps.

April 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Capt. John Helm, USMC, operations officer for Marine Aviation Training Systems Site (MATSS) Iwakuni, Japan, prepares for take-off in the F/A-18D Tactical Operational Flight Trainer (TOFT) 37.

Trainer offers much-needed concurrency updates while new processes promise future advantages.

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