Navy Technologies

December 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Chief Petty Officer Ron Banks, USN (l), and Senior Chief Adam Phillips, USN, familiarize themselves with the General Dynamics littoral combat ship (LCS) maritime information command center simulator. The simulator is being used to evaluate the center’s design and to help the LCS’ first crew learn about the ship’s interfaces.
Training transforms to meet needs of initial crew.

December 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
An aviation boatswain’s mate 3rd class signals for launch sequence preparation on the flight deck of the USS Kitty Hawk. The way the U.S. Navy conducts combat operations will change significantly as new network-centric architectures open up innovative capabilities.
Major efforts such as FORCEnet are only the bow wave of a radical new infostructure.

December 2005
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

December 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

Military moves to state-of-the-shelf technology using state- of-the-art business practices.

After years of following their own paths, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps will finally share one uniform—for their information technology systems, that is. Work currently underway will transform a multitude of individual systems into a single intranet that will allow the fluid and secure sharing of data, voice and video among more than 350,000 land-based users and, through satellite communications, to deployed troops as well.

December 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

Changes in technologies prompt changes in doctrine.

The U.S. Navy is charting the waters of its future by exploring experimental concepts and delving into the technologies that will support network-centric operations. The Navy After Next will exploit the power of forward, distributed, sea-based forces to build battlespace depth and to project focused combat power. The pivotal change for the future Navy will be its flexible networking of sensors and forces—both joint and coalition.

December 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

December 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The software communications architecture (SCA) being developed by the Raytheon Company will allow U.S. Navy ships and ground facilities to communicate with high-bandwidth next-generation satellites. The SCA also creates guidelines for the development of new waveforms for software programmable radios.
Rule paves way for programmable high-capacity equipment.

December 2004
By Capt. Joseph Giaquinto, USN; Maj. Woody Hesser, USMC; and Lt. Cmdr. Dan Rieken, USN

 
Operations Specialist 1st Class Tim Martin, USN, monitors surface contacts in the Tactical Flag Command Center aboard the USS Enterprise. Naval vessels support current operations; however, the FORCEnet Engagement Packs (FnEPs) concept proposes a way to extend the combat reach of the battle groups.
Concept delivers tomorrow’s naval network-centric capabilities today.

December 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
The USS Tarawa sails under the Golden Gate Bridge into San Francisco Bay. The U.S. Navy’s transformation will network legacy systems and next-generation platforms in an architecture that brings to bear the full value of network-centric warfare.
Technology alters the face of the force for both materiel and personnel.

December 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Navy F-14B Tomcat launches off the deck of the USS John F. Kennedy in support of operation Iraqi Freedom. Navy personnel in theater are requesting more elements of FORCEnet as they learn to exploit some of its capabilities.
It’s not just information; it’s a warfighting system.

December 2001
By Maryann Lawlor

Situation well in hand for industry, U.S. Navy partnership.

Despite a delayed launch, the first year of the maiden voyage of a different approach to military acquisition of information technology products and services has been mostly smooth sailing. The Navy/Marine Corps Intranet is well underway, and key leaders from both industry and the U.S. Defense Department say they are pleased with the progress that has been made so far.

December 2001
By Maryann Lawlor

Specialist community built on foundation of continuous education.

The U.S. Navy is shoring up its information systems capabilities with the creation of a new restricted line designation for its officers. The information professional community will concentrate on space systems, information technology, network operations and protection, and enhanced fighting techniques. This new group joins the ranks of two long-established specialties in intelligence and cryptography.

December 2001
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Navy opts for the march of technology rather than leap-ahead wishes.

The next generation of U.S. Navy aircraft carriers will feature evolutionary rather than revolutionary advances in technologies and capabilities. The new vessels are being designed with an open architecture to permit growth in virtually every key component and system, and special allowances are being made for adding complex electronics systems as the Navy focuses on network-centric warfare.

December 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

Pacific-based fleet offers a microcosm of U.S. Navy technology and capability issues.

The U.S. Navy 7th Fleet is incorporating new technologies for joint and combined exercises and operations that lie at the very heart of the Navy’s transformation efforts. The Japan-based fleet often finds itself serving as a floating testbed for new network-centric warfare concepts as it carries out its daily missions in the Pacific and Indian oceans while simultaneously supporting the war on terrorism.

December 2002
By Tiffany Gerstmar

Modified verification process offers immediate solution.

The U.S. Navy and an information assurance tiger team made up of industry and government personnel are tailoring certification and accreditation processes to validate the legacy systems and applications that are transitioning into the Navy/Marine Corps Intranet. The work ensures that fielded systems comply with U.S. Defense Department information security requirements.

December 2002
By Maryann Lawlor

New organization shores up assistance to techno-convoy of information systems.

Move over ships, aircraft and submarines, and make room on the waterfront for the latest component in the U.S. Navy’s fleet—information systems. Although information technology has long been an integral part of the Navy, the service’s newest command brings an increased level of support to fleet commanders and creates a clear operational focus for its networks, space activities and information operations.

June 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
Secretary of the Navy Gordon R. England (c) walks with U.S. Navy and Marine Corps officers and other personnel in Kabul, Afghanistan. Changes spearheaded by the Navy/Marine Corps Intranet are affecting the force transformation that defines Navy and Marine Corps operations on land, at sea and in the air.
Technology-enabled organizational transformation emerges.

September 2002
By Maryann Lawlor

Merger reflects current needs, future plans.

The U.S. Navy is steaming full speed ahead to make network-centric warfare a reality by merging its directorate in charge of communications, computers and space with the warfare requirements and programs directorate. The move is at the center of a new operational vision for the service called Sea Power 21 outlined by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Vernon E. Clark, USN, Navy Pentagon, Washington, D.C.

December 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

 

The U.S. Navy's free electron laser soon may be providing fleet air defense for surface vessels. Recent experiments have drawn scientists closer to power levels that will make the multifaceted defensive system a reality. 

Researchers have seen the light for protecting surface ships against multiple threats.

December 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

 

As part of the Navy/Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI), the U.S. Navy has stood up network operation centers (NOCs) in Oahu, Hawaii, and Norfolk, Virginia, similar to this one in San Diego. Another NOC is being set up at the U.S. Marine Corps base in Quantico, Virginia. 

U.S. Navy incorporates adjustments while continuing on a steady course.

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