Tactical Operations

November 2006
By Rita Boland

 
An element of the Common Aviation Command and Control System (CAC2S) is undergoing developmental testing at U.S. Marine Corps Tactical Systems Support Activity (MCTSSA), Camp Pendleton, California. The Marine Corps expects to field the system in fiscal year 2008.
Technology combines disparate command and control subsystems and makes them mobile.

November 2006
By Rita Boland

 
Speech-to-speech translation software, such as SRI International’s IraqComm system, allows people speaking different languages to communicate without a human interpreter. IraqComm translates spoken English into spoken Iraqi Arabic and has undergone an investigative fielding in Iraq.
A technology undergoing investigation provides communications capabilities without human translators.

November 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

November 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The combined air operations center located in southwest Asia is one element of network-centric operations in current operations. The Office of Force Transformation is coordinating a series of case studies to evaluate how network centricity affects warfare.
Increased information sharing saves lives, supports calculated risk taking.

November 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Members of the 13th Air Support Operations Squadron launch an AN/PRC-148 payload during test flights prior to the Combat SkySat demonstration in March. The tests helped determine the ideal operational altitudes for the radios.
Extended connectivity emerges out of thin air.

November 2005
By Jeff Hawk

 
The Early Entry Deployment Support Kit (EEDSK) can be deployed on supply ships to help track the delivery and distribution of equipment.
Satellite link could help logisticians remotely troubleshoot vehicle malfunctions.

November 1999
By Henry S. Kenyon

Exercise acts as testbed for new command and control, sensing and communications methods.

The U.S. Air Force is examining the latest technologies for integrating enhanced communications and targeting methods throughout the command and control structure, reaching down to the tactical level to achieve mission objectives faster and with less risk to friendly forces. These approaches and devices will be applied in future operations such as conflict resolution and humanitarian relief.

November 1999
By Henry S. Kenyon

Informal signals operation leverages unique resources, creates real-world training environment.

A company-level signals training exercise between elements of the Arizona Air and Army National Guard and an active U.S. Army unit demonstrates the possibility of increased interservice cooperation at the tactical level. Participants in the informal two-day operation used the units’ combined assets to set up a communications grid and familiarize active duty and reserve military personnel with each other’s equipment and procedures.

November 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Battle laboratory draws on expertise from numerous sources to investigate the effects of a joint presence on the battlefield.

Using modeling and simulation technologies, military, government and industry representatives are gazing as much as 15 years into the future to determine how joint forces will function cohesively while fighting a battle or keeping the peace. The thrust for interoperable technologies is being taken one step further by focusing on joint concepts of operations that intertwine both the U.S. military services as well as coalition force strengths.

November 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Exercise facilitates interaction between active and reserve units, training with critical technology of future joint missions.

December 1999
By Jim Grace

Marriage of yesterday’s munitions and today’s technologies addresses mandate for cost-effective, accurate weapon systems.

The U.S. military is incorporating technologies developed for low-cost projectile and long-range missile guidance into a variety of field artillery weapons. Results of recently conducted tests demonstrate that a fast acquisition global positioning system product and a tactical-grade inertial guidance system could perform as testers expected in battlefield environments while continuing to provide required accuracy. The costs of these technologies are potentially lower than current systems.

November 2000
By Henry S. Kenyon

Brigade subscriber nodes allow soldiers to communicate across a wide spectrum of equipment and protocols.

U.S. Army rapid deployment forces will field an advanced communications management system that will provide its units with a more efficient data conduit than is available with legacy equipment. The vehicle-mounted platform consists of mobile switches and routers that feature integrated commercial and government hardware and software designed to provide voice, video and data service in a tactical environment.

November 2000
By Christian B. Sheehy

Experimental unmanned machines could assume high-risk field duties.

By the latter part of this decade, a fleet of wheeled robots now evolving toward autonomy may perform many of the tasks handled by today’s front-line soldier. The U.S. Army is experimenting with a prototype of radio-operated vehicles capable of engaging in various kinds of reconnaissance and surveillance activities. Once fully integrated into the service, these unmanned units will enable the execution of important objectives while reducing the casualties and logistical complexities often associated with rapid reaction forces.

November 2000
By Robert K. Ackerman

Leap ahead and reach back become complementary concepts for military network mavens.

The information assets inherent in strategic connectivity may soon extend down to the individual soldier in the foxhole. Not only will combatants be able to provide their own slant on theater operations, they also may be able to tap the massive data resources of the entire U.S. Defense Department.

November 2000
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Air Force’s newest weapon is information, and the service is already developing its related weapon system.

The next air combat operation may feature command and control as a distinct warfighting element. U.S. Air Force planners are working to move information processing and decision making directly into the flow of combat.

This approach does not require choosing between bytes and bombs. Instead, information derived from intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) would join air-to-air missiles and precision-guided bombs in an aircraft’s arsenal. Data assimilated from diverse sources would elevate decision making to a level at which it would become an interactive part of warfighting operations.

November 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Air Force fighter aircraft, the F/A-22 Raptor, engages in future air combat in this artist’s concept. The aircraft is a key element in the Air Force’s future as a networked force.
Rapidly improving technologies are changing traditional tactical roles.

November 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Soldiers from the 57th Signal Battalion and A/111th Signal Battalion pull fiber through manholes as part of the work to improve the telecommunication infrastructure in Baghdad.
Military builds foundation for the future.

November 2004
By Adam Baddeley

November 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

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