cloud computing

May 1, 2013
 

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has released the most comprehensive update to the government’s computer security guide since 2005. The fourth revision of “Security and Privacy Controls for Federal information Systems and Organizations” (SP 800-53) addresses issues such as mobile and cloud computing, applications security, supply chain risks and privacy concerns. It also calls for maintaining routine best practices to reduce information security risks while applying state-of-the-practice architecture and engineering principles to minimize the impact of threats such as cyber attacks.

March 20, 2013
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) began working on its Yourcloud solution about two years ago and expects to have the cloud computing solution in place by year's end. You can read more about this in "U.S. Nuclear Agency Enhances Cybersecurity With Cloud Computing
." 

February 28, 2013
George I. Seffers

Top information technology officials from a variety of government agencies identified cloud computing, mobile devices and edge technologies as the technologies that will be critical for accomplishing their missions in the future.

Luke McCormack, chief information officer, Justice Department, cited cloud-as-a-service as vital to the future. He urged industry to continue to push the barriers of stack computing, and he mentioned edge technology as an emerging technology. “Edge is going to be really critical to perform missions,” he said. He cited the Google Glass project as an indicator of what the future will bring.

January 4, 2013
By George I. Seffers

The National Security Agency (NSA) is poised to deliver an initial cloud computing capability for the entire intelligence community (IC) that will significantly enhance cybersecurity and mission performance, and unleash the power of innovation for intelligence agencies, Lonny Anderson, NSA chief information officer, says.

July 12, 2012
 

On Wednesday, the Defense Department (DOD) issued its long-awaited cloud computing strategy. Officials also announced in a memo from Teri Takai, chief information officer for the DOD, that the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) will oversee the new strategy as "enterprise cloud service broker." The designation means that all department components are required to obtain cloud-computing capabilities through DISA or to obtain a waiver from Takai's office as the DOD's designated review authority.

July 11, 2012
By George Seffers

Terremark Federal Group Incorporated, Miami, Florida, is being awarded a $9,116,831 modification to a firm-fixed-price contract to provide cloud-based computing, infrastructure, data, and analytical support under the General Services Administration Special Item Number (SIN) 132-51 and SIN 132-52. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is the contracting activity.

May 25, 2012
By Beverly Schaeffer

The U.S. Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is helping lead the charge to bring more mobility, cloud computing and information sharing to the Defense Department. Sweeping changes ahead aim to make secure and nonsecure communications possible down to the handheld level. In this month's issue of SIGNAL Magazine, Technology Editor George I.

February 29, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor

While the general perception is that a cloud is a cloud, that won't be the case for government agencies. Experts revealed more specifics about federal, state and local migration to cloud computing during the first panel at AFCEA International's Homeland Security Conference. Eventually a governmentwide cloud for all services and data may be created, but today, while some services can move to the cloud environment, others will require customized clouds. For example, email services are a good candidate for the cloud, but those agencies that require extra security are likely to create private clouds for data storage and exchange.

January 6, 2012
By Rachel Eisenhower

A recently released draft plan provides a road map for federal agencies and industry to navigate through the development of the cloud-computing model. In the January issue of SIGNAL Magazine, Technology Editor George I. Seffers explores the document in his article, "Hitting the Hard Spots on the Road to Cloud."

December 21, 2011
By Dan Barber

From securing the cloud to unwrapping new architecture compliance requirements, 2011 was a busy year for the tech public sector. In the New Year's spirit of renewal and rededication, here are five resolutions federal agencies should make. 1. Leverage IT to meet budget requirements The government fiscal landscape changed radically in the last year with budget cuts across the majority of federal agencies. The Obama's Administration fiscal 2012 budget proposal calls for a five-year discretionary spending freeze along with $33 billion in additional cuts. Yet, there is a reason why federal IT spending to commercial contractors is expected to grow five percent annually.

September 30, 2011
By George Seffers

Telcordia Technologies Incorporated of Piscataway, New Jersey, is being awarded a $7,111,956 cost plus fixed fee contract to research, develop, test, and deploy the Autonomous Collaborative Control for Resilient Cyber Defense system. The focus will be on the development of a clean slate approach to engineer cloud computing infrastructure that designs out known vulnerabilities and provides the ability to contain previously unknown attacks to recover with immunity. Deliverable items are software, hardware, and technical reports. Air Force Research Laboratory, Rome New York, is the contracting activity.

September 30, 2011
By George Seffers

SRI International of Menlo Park, California, is being awarded a $7,491,195 cost plus fixed fee contract to be a companion program to the existing Clean-slate design of resilient, adaptive, secure hosts (CRASH) effort. CRASH takes a clean-slate approach to limiting the vulnerabilities within each host. Modular research-based composably trustworthy mission-oriented resilient clouds is concerned with the amplifying effect of the network, seeking to turn this around and use the network as a vulnerability damper and a source of resiliency. Deliverable items include prototype software, hardware and reports. Air Force Research Laboratory, Rome New York, is the contracting activity.

September 30, 2011
By George Seffers

International Business Machines Corporation, Global Government Industry, Bethesda, Maryland, is being awarded a $12,171,809 firm-fixed-price and cost-reimbursement contract for Enterprise Information Services Production Environment, a cloud-like "platform as a service" information technology hosting environment used to host classified and unclassified Air Force data and software programs. Electronic Systems Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force base, Ohio, is the contracting activity.

September 9, 2011
By Beverly Schaeffer

It's been slow going for Defense Department IT since the Clinger-Cohen Act of 1996 mandated creating the Information Technology Architecture. In 1999, the Federal Chief Information Officers Council defined the Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA). It's now 2011, and according to a Government Accountability Office report, the enterprise architecture methodology still has not deployed. In his viewpoint article "About Face" in this issue of SIGNAL Magazine, Paul A.

August 1, 2011
By Beverly Schaeffer

Industry leaders are working hard to identify and create the Internet of the future, and News Editor Rita Boland digs in with an examination of this virtual "ground breaking" in cyberspace in her article, "Upcoming Online Experiences," in this issue of SIGNAL Magazine. The piece is the first in a four-part SIGNAL semaphore series: The Future of the Internet. Kevin Orr, Cisco Corporation's vice president of U.S.

July 15, 2011
By Beverly Schaeffer

The computing device shouldn't matter, nor its provider: Defense Department personnel just want their information securely, by authorized channels, in a timely manner. Department customers want personal information assistants (PIAs), adapted to their position, training level and necessary connections. Paul A. Strassmann discusses the potential way forward in his article, "A Culture Shock Is Coming," in this issue of SIGNAL Magazine. Info sources must include data received from people, sensors or public websites.

May 13, 2011
By Beverly T. Schaeffer

With the thousands of applications running on U.S. Defense Department networks, programmers have literally been dream weavers, pulling together the pieces necessary to make these systems fully functional. Hundreds of contracting organizations are tied up in these networks, making it a monumental challenge to pool all resources into an efficient, future "whole." But as with any evolution, it cannot take place overnight. In his second installment in a series of articles covering defense information technology, Paul A.

November 3, 2010
By George Seffers

Autonomic Resources recently announced that it has been awarded one of the General Services Administration's first blanket purchase agreements for the first government-wide contract for cloud computing. Under this agreement, Autonomic Resources will offer public cloud services to provide U.S. government customers with simplified computing power, storage, and networking infrastructure that can be acquired and utilized on-demand, all from certified data centers with enhanced multi-factor authentication access. Autonomic Resources is one of only a few vendors to have met the technical requirements necessary to be awarded a GSA contract for cloud computing.

August 17, 2010
By Rachel Eisenhower
Apps Tap into Cloud Computing

Apps Tap into Cloud Computing

May 24, 2010
By Henry Kenyon

The hard-hitting storms that beleaguered parts of the United States this year taught the East Coast a valuable lesson-sometimes you just can't get to work. But with immovable deadlines tasks still must be accomplished. One way offices can continue to function with personnel in disparate locations (assuming they all have power) is by storing documents in locations other than organizations' computer drives. Using the Internet as a storage device enables people to continue to move work forward, even if they can't get out the front door.

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