March 2004

March 2004
By Jeffrey J. Becker

 

Experiment participants collaborate in the U.S. Joint Forces Command's Distributed Continuous Experimentation Environment (DCEE). The DCEE is a dedicated experimentation facility that allows the command to test and evaluate new concepts and prototypes with military personnel worldwide.

March 2004
By Col. (S) Bradley K. Ashley, USAF

 

Personnel holding watch in air operations centers during flight operations regularly rely on networking for coordination of efforts. A cyberterrorist attach on military networks could seriously compromise missions.

The danger is real, and the country must prepare.

By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

 

The Terrain Commander from Textron Corporation provides the basis for the U.S. Army's unattended ground sensor (UGS) Future Combat Systems. The sensor assembly is equipped with a variety of optical, acoustic and seismic devices. Note the laptop computer for displays in a sensor cell.

Combat forces aided by new devices find tanks and mines, thwart ambushes.

By Maryann Lawlor

 

U.S. Army soldiers from Bravo Troop, 9th Cavalry Brigade Reconnaissance Team, 3rd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, ascend stairs while searching a house in Samarrah, Iraq. At a table-top war game later this month, the U.S. Joint Forces Command (JFCOM) and the U.S. Marine Corps will be examining techniques that can be employed in urban operations to improve effectiveness.

March 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

 

Lt. Gen. Harry D. Raduege Jr., USAF, director, Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), says that organizational change is necessary to remain relevant.

Realignment focuses on business strategies.

March 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 

The introduction of new surveillance and reconnaissance systems will require new ways of collecting, processing and disseminating various forms of data. The distributed common ground system, of DCGS, is designed to fuse imagery, tactical data, signals intelligence and open source information.

March 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

Simpler seekers and simpler steering can lead to more on-target warheads.

A new approach to guided munitions may empower small warheads with the same targeting precision employed by larger glide bombs and missiles. The technology takes a low-cost approach to guidance that could improve precision for artillery rounds, mortar shells and grenades for as little as $100 per warhead. Mass-production ultimately could open up the technology for bullets at an even lower cost.

March 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

 

The Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) High satellite constellation is scheduled to replace aging Defense Support Program missile detection spacecraft. Although SBIRS-High satellites will perform some of the early warning duties of their predecessors, they are multirole platforms capable of battlefield assessment and surveillance missions.

January 2004
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

It’s time for us to admit that operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom both were victories for the command and control capability provided by the Defense Information Systems Agency, or DISA. The military’s communications provider rose to the occasion and served up a platter of bandwidth to information-hungry network-centric forces. The result was two overwhelming victories that reinforced the concept of information as the linchpin for U.S. military supremacy.

Now, DISA enters a new era in which its status as a Defense Department agency is taking on an operational role. It is becoming a part of a combatant command, and this promises to alter DISA’s character as well as its standing within the defense community.

March 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

 

Israeli designed and manufactured tactical military communcations and control systems now have new entree into the European market.

Consolidation is a key to highly competitive business environment.

March 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

Research seeks to speed military data integration through advanced modeling, new computing techniques and policies.

Future warfighters will benefit from enhanced information technology infrastructure and hardware as well as support services being developed by the U.S. Defense Department. As a part of its ongoing transformation efforts, the military is changing established cultural and business practices to meet the computing needs of widely dispersed U.S. forces.