January 2004

January 2004
By Travis Good

 

Instructor Richard Nolan prepares U.S. Army Reserve Information Operations Command (ARIOC) soldiers for a hands-on exercise implementing the Network Time Protocol. It is part of a four-day advanced information assurance training course specially developed for the ARIOC at the Software Engineering Institute.

January 2004
By Col. Alan D. Campen, USAF (Ret.)

Technology can both aid and dominate the warfighter.

Network-centric warfare is widely acclaimed to be the centerpiece of military transformation. It has been embraced enthusiastically by the United States and some allied armed forces. However, critics question whether this nascent philosophy is yet fully deserving of star billing. They urge more thoughtful analysis, extensive operational experimentation and testing, and firm budget and procurement commitments before its precepts become frozen into doctrine, organization and strategy.

January 2004
By Gen. Lance W. Lord, USAF

Space systems are a vanguard for the new network-centric force.

January 2004

 

TechNet Europe 2003, held in Rome, drew a multinational, multifaceted audience for its conference theme "Internet: Friend or Foe?" 

NATO forces must overcome hurdles as they seek to exploit its technology.

January 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

 

CCAT funded this prototype of a wireless surveillance camera that is currently being used by the San Diego Police Department. Developed by VivaMicro, the technology provides analytical capabilities such as unusual activity detection or suspicious thermal imaging activity detection.

Consortium quickens security product development.

January 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

 

DIMHRS will allow Pentagon staff to access service members' personnel records from a single database to determine the number of people in the service, their pay grades and the skills they possess.

Integrated system brings jointness to military human resources.

January 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 

U.S. Air Force personnel unload cargo from a C-17. A new database system based on commercial hardware and software will allow the Defense Logistics Agency to process requisitions and ship material to customers much faster than was possible in the past. 

The private sector is the font of innovation for military supply processes.

January 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 

TacSat-1 is designed to permit tactical air or ground users to control the satellite through the secret Internet protocol router network, or SIPRNET.

A joint concept orbiter may show the way for tactical surveillance orbiters.

January 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

 

Developed by Computas NA, the Metis planning and visualization tool permits managers to map enterprise architectures by laying out objects such as business processes and their relationships to each other. These interactions are displayed on a template showing the links between an organization and its information technology infrastructure. 

January 2004
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

Since 1946, AFCEA has prided itself on the role it plays in being a conduit between government and industry. Our association has served to help move the finest technology offered by the Free World into the hands of its warfighters. This has been accomplished because of the ethical environment that AFCEA creates to allow frank “roll-up-the-sleeves” dialogue. This environment enables government to be exposed to the great advances that information technology (IT) is making in the commercial sector. I am convinced that AFCEA has played a key role in making the use of COTS, or commercial off-the-shelf, equipment an accepted practice for government IT professionals.

January 2004
By Edward Griswold

 

Tactical communications gear used during military operations in Southwest Asia, such as this satellite equipment, is being replaced by private contractors to free soldiers and more mobile military equipment for forward redeployment.

Long-haul operations require getting equipment out of the elements and into permanent structures.

January 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

Outside inspection helps with software, equipment interoperability.

A third-party testing and verification regimen allows program managers and directors to save time and money by efficiently integrating commercial systems into mission-critical environments. When it is initiated at the beginning of a program, the practice offers an additional means of detecting faults in systems before they are deployed.

January 2004
By Cheryl Lilie

 

A black and white photograph taken from a prototype reconnaissance round shows a person standing in a sod farm near Atlanta in the testing range for the device. 

“Point and shoot” takes on new meaning to the infantry soldier.