Knowledge Management

October 2007
By Rita Boland

 
With Remote Forensics, computer forensics analysts can use a mobile telephone to perform investigations. The system enables forensics analysts to remain at one location and carry out analyses on computers anywhere in the world.
Rather than sending experts to the computers, organizations use hardware and the Internet to disseminate data around the world.

October 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

Planning and logistics system monitors readiness of units, equipment and individuals.

The U.S. Air National Guard is using a data mining and analysis tool to keep track of everything from jet engines to personnel qualifications. The software package allows users to access and compile information from a variety of sources, offering the ability to conduct high-level analysis or in-depth study of a specific unit’s readiness. The technology will soon enter service with the U.S. Army National Guard and U.S. Air Force Reserve.

May 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Army officer uses a Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below, or FBCB2, system. U.S. Defense Department planners are striving to ensure that data inherent in this and other position location displays can be shared with similar systems across service lines.
The key is to allow users to view different data their own way.

May 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The Office of Naval Research funds a number of programs at universities, military commands and small businesses that are examining how members of a decision-making team manage information, add personal knowledge and collaborate to create tactics.
Military, industry and academia lay the groundwork for effective knowledge management tool designs.

May 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A low-profile organization looks far ahead into an esoteric world.

May 2005
By Robert K.Ackerman

 
A U.S. Marine F/A-18 Hornet catapults from the deck of the USS Harry S Truman in support of ongoing operations in Iraq. The office of the J-6, the Joint Staff, gives top priority to support of U.S. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The list of requirements is long and the margin for error is small in wartime.

February 2002
By Maryann Lawlor

Software tool connects the dots between related pieces of data.

The solution to information overload may lie in one of the key contributors to the phenomenon. Recently developed software now can address the complementary issues of managing data and making it more useful. Personnel at the U.S. Joint Forces Command Joint Experimentation Directorate are exploring systems that could transform military engagement methodology and usher in decision-based operations.

February 2002
By Maryann Lawlor

Portal opens doors to one-stop service.

The U.S. Army is putting the power of Web technology behind its transformation into a knowledge-based force. The effort aims at improving the decision dominance of individual soldiers and the Army as a whole by sharing information and making its cumulative expertise a powerful instrument.

February 2002
By Sharon Berry

Knowledge templates may bring stability to businesses struggling in a changing economy.

Professionals often find solutions that repeatedly prove successful. By documenting these best-of-breed approaches, experts are now able to develop working taxonomies of patterns of success. Known as knowledge patterns, these resources will result in an array of tools to help conduct audits, develop strategies and make decisions.

August 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

Analysts can archive, translate large amounts of vital facts quickly.

New technologies that increase the ability to process and enhance text documents are giving a badly needed boost to intelligence experts fighting terrorists and their weapons of mass destruction. Many of these technologies are being employed overseas on the battlegrounds of Afghanistan and Iraq as well as in the pursuit of terrorists in other countries.