March 2003

March 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

Future weapons platform designed to quell tomorrow’s threats.

Hellfire missile-toting Predators are an interim measure to increase combatant power in the area of operations. But the U.S. military is moving forward quickly on the path to a force-enabling tactical air power weapon system for both pre-emptive and reactive strikes.

March 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

Geospatial intelligence demands strong public/private partnerships.

The National Imagery and Mapping Agency is in the midst of a pivotal year as it creates its own functional identity as the geospatial intelligence provider for military and homeland security organizations. The agency will be looking for substantial support from the commercial sector—including foreign companies—while it transforms and concurrently meets the growing needs of the defense community.

March 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

Experts share insight about new missions, solutions.

The future role of information technology in support of homeland security and the war on terrorism initiatives will be the focus of TechNet International 2003, May 6-8. In its new venue—the recently opened Washington Convention Center, Washington, D.C.—AFCEA International will offer three days of information presentations and technology demonstrations in an integrated setting.

March 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

Data fusion, information sharing technologies link allied forces.

Future commanders may benefit from an enhanced situational awareness and battlefield management system that fuses sensor and information feeds to create a coherent picture of an engagement. The system will permit data to be relayed, shared and analyzed by allied joint forces across multiple echelons.

In the past few years, computer and sensor systems have provided leaders with unprecedented amounts of information. Ongoing programs seek to harness this raw data with architectures that outperform and break opposing forces’ decision cycles.

March 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

Futuristic facility helps service direct operations.

By co-locating its intelligence and operations communities under one high-technology roof, the U.S. Marine Corps I Marine Expeditionary Force can now manage multiple missions from a single command center. Systems at the facility allow decision makers to review and analyze information pouring in from tactical network sensors and help the Marines plan and execute military operations, ensure base security and support localized efforts such as fighting forest fires.

March 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

Mobile calling for emergency response is up and running.

Emergency responders now can count on priority cellular access in a pinch as the U.S. government establishes a wireless version of its Government Emergency Telecommunications Service. Known as the Wireless Priority System, or WPS, the new cellular system promises connectivity in a shirt pocket for authorized users ranging from the president down to a local fire chief.

Marach 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

New applications permit data, message sharing between communications protocols.

Manufacturers are poised to release new equipment that will permit universal roaming for cellular telephone and mobile devices. Recent processor and software developments are leading to products that can operate across different global communications protocols.

March 2003
By James C. Bussert

Problem may be more widespread than officials acknowledge.

Having effective sensors, fire control, ordnance and control systems is only part of the picture for building a capable shipboard combat system. The task that makes all of these play together is called combat system integration, or CSI.

Many foreign navies rely on CSI to pull together shipboard combat systems that have components originating from different suppliers. If integration is not done well, it can be very costly and take years to do what should take months. Valuable warships needed for naval missions can be unavailable for years. The result is best described as combat system dis-integration.

March 2003
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

If there is one issue that has been a common thread throughout the spread of military information systems over the past few decades, it is interoperability. What once was a nuisance quickly grew into a major challenge as we became more reliant on information technology to prevail in the way we fight. What once was a marginal issue grew to dominate command, control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) as a key requirement for all future systems. Yet, as interoperability continues to increase in importance, as a goal it remains stubbornly elusive.

March 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

Afghanistan proves the worth of total battlefield awareness.

Network-centric warfare proved to be a key enabler for U.S. special operations forces to rout the Taliban in Afghanistan, according to a general in the U.S. Special Operations Command. These forces were empowered by shared situational awareness and robust communications that allowed them to maximize the effects of air and naval support against Taliban positions.

March 2003
By Sharon Berry

Scientists develop an Internet-scale persistent data store with the advantages of collaborative computing.

Researchers at the University of California–Berkeley have developed an approach to information security and sharing that combines the power of the Internet with a memory-sharing system and creates a globally distributed hard drive that is accessible to millions of users. The information would remain intact even when servers fail, natural disasters strike, malicious attacks are launched or all three occur simultaneously.

March 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

Glimmer of hope shines through the gloom as firms deal with management, capacity issues.

The telecommunications industry will see minimal growth this year in the wake of several large corporate bankruptcies and massive network overcapacity. Major issues such as mismanagement must be addressed to regain the trust of shareholders and government oversight agencies, analysts say. Sales of hardware will lag behind services as disillusionment settles in about the industry’s performance. But a silver lining remains—the continuing growth of services such as broadband and wireless messaging.