February 2003

February 2003
By Cmdr. Deborah R. Kern, USN; Debra Nissenbaum; and Robert Putes

Diverse groups face similar issues of interoperability, technology and architecture.

Interoperability between service, state and federal agencies and coalition forces is vital to securing the Asia-Pacific region. Equally important is the implementation of information assurance measures to get information to the right place at the right time. And, a streamlined acquisition process is needed that delivers joint systems that adhere to standards and policy.

February 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

Focus shifts from destruction to reconstruction.

Military doctrines about fighting in cities and towns are evolving, and the U.S. Army is turning to high technology systems to teach and evaluate how warfighters will adapt to the new objectives in an emerging battlespace. The service is examining tactics, techniques and procedures and developing concepts that support maneuvers that can transition from offense and defense to stabilization and support.

February 2003
By Sharon Berry

Submerged order of battle changes.

Having established new procedures and incorporated new technologies for surface and air situational awareness, the U.S. Navy now is looking to extend that capability underwater. The sea service is working with the private sector to apply new data fusion techniques to antisubmarine warfare.

Nowhere is this need more acute than in the Pacific region. Roughly two-thirds of the world’s submarines capable of operating in the Pacific Ocean are now owned by nations not traditionally considered to be U.S. allies, and the U.S. Navy is collaborating with industry to address this new reality.

February 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

No clear pattern yet has emerged to current and future expenditures.

More than 16 months after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, U.S. government spending on homeland security has yet to settle into a predictable routine. Tens of billions of dollars have been allocated to domestic and foreign operations aimed at deterring, preventing or recovering from terrorist activities. Some of these appropriations have funded startup programs that promise long-term benefits, while others support long-extant efforts that are the only options available for immediate action in the war on terrorism.

February 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

Firms join forces to provide integrated solutions.

Corporate America is helping assemble the homeland defense jigsaw puzzle that includes thousands of pieces being put together by hundreds of people looking at a multitude of different pictures. Industry leaders agree that the biggest challenge is the complexity of the problem and the plethora of solutions being proposed by companies with a range of specialties taking widely varying approaches.

February 2003
By Lt. Col. Eberhard A. Mueller-von der Bank, GEA (Ret.), Regional Vice President, Central European Region

February 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

Missions continue to expand for latest military platforms.

Recognizing the power that unmanned aerial vehicles bring to the battlespace, military personnel are calling for more—so much so that the demand is nearly outpacing the supply. The U.S. military is very pleased with the performance of the aircraft in the war on terrorism and continues to investigate new enhancements to current systems. The U.S. Defense Department is working to determine how the vehicles can be integrated into the total force structure most effectively.

February 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

Business dealings will change with the U.S. government’s biggest structural revamp in 50 years.

The major consolidation of federal agencies that is creating the new Department of Homeland Security also is impelling private industry to adapt to the changing landscape. The resulting environment places more responsibility on businesses to protect vital infrastructure, but it also clears the way to a closer and more productive relationship between the commercial and public sectors.

February 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

Information-technology-capable personnel open up a new future for operations.

The newly independent U.S. Air Force Space Command is focusing on integrating exo-atmospheric operations with lower altitude activities, including ground campaigns. These operations in space, which range from communications to precision guiding of munitions, are becoming less of a separate warfighting aspect and more of a united element of high-technology network-centric warfare.

February 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

Maintaining assured access to space is at the heart of command restructuring efforts.

More than 10 years after the end of the Cold War, the U.S. Defense Department is shedding old constructs from that period that have been hindering the department’s new thrust into space. A major component of these changes places the primary responsibility for acquiring and launching military space systems in the hands of the U.S. Air Force. Within the service, new commands and offices also are being established to interface with homeland security efforts and joint organizations such as the U.S. Northern Command.

February 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

A U.S. Defense Department program combines technologies into a network to identify, predict and prevent terrorist attacks.

A variety of technologies under development by U.S. government researchers soon may help security organizations to track, anticipate and preclude terrorist activity. Part of an overarching program, these applications will permit analysts and decision makers quickly to assess and act upon patterns and trends in terrorist activity. 

February 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman