July 2004

July 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
Portable satellite communications products are being used by a number of U.S. government customers such as the U.S. Naval Criminal Investigative Service. The agency used Tachyon Network’s equipment to stream live video to its Washington, D.C., headquarters. 
System offers fiber-optic speed, reliability to space-based data transmissions.

July 2004

Military, government and industry experts gathered at the AFCEA Alamo Chapter’s Fiesta Informacion 2004 in April to present their perspectives on the transformation—its successes, problems and evolving requirements. During the three-day symposium, more than 2,300 registrants heard panels addressing interoperability, security, collaboration, and integration issues and challenges.

Gen. John P. Jumper, USAF, chief of staff, U.S. Air Force, kicked off Fiesta Informacion 2004 during his keynote luncheon speech by challenging industry “to give him ideas and solutions.” He stressed that he wanted “IT ahead of its time to help put the cursor over the target.”

July 2004
By Adam Baddeley

 
Military and civil organizations such as the police departments that use the Terrestrial Trunked Radio, or TETRA, will use the Finnish Software Radio Program (FSRP) radio to bridge their different networks to support domestic operations, including disaster relief.
Unique circumstances lead to differing requirements for the nordic neutral.

July 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

July 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

July 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

Initial operational capability for the U.S. military is on the near horizon.

A new generation of highly capable robot aircraft soon may augment and perhaps replace manned platforms in high-threat combat operations such as suppressing enemy air defenses and deep strike missions. These vehicles are part of an ambitious U.S. Defense Department program to develop and field-test an unmanned aerial combat capability by the end of the decade.

July 2004
By Cheryl Lilie

Researchers pick up good vibrations to locate buried mines.

Exciting a land mine may not sound like a good idea, but developers of the Seismic Landmine Detection System are doing just that. A group of researchers from the Georgia Tech Research Institute in Atlanta, Georgia, has developed a land mine detection system that sends seismic waves through a minefield, slightly moving the earth and items buried beneath. A noncontacting radar sensor measures the ground displacement to identify and locate plastic anti-personnel or antitank mines.

July 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
Network-centric capabilities will permit aircraft such as this F-15E to share data about threats and mission objectives and relay it to next-generation Internet-protocol-enabled weapons that can shift to new targets in mid-flight.  
Communications and data architecture to stretch from under the sea to out in space.

July 2004
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

If we really believe a network-centric coalition/joint force offers an opportunity for effects-based conflict in the future—and that this same network-centric force improves lethality, intelligence sharing and command and control—then why aren’t we embracing the concept of changing the culture to match the technology capabilities that Free World industry is offering to warfighters in the fight for freedom?

July 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Navy F/A-18C Hornet prepares to launch for evening operations in operation Iraqi Freedom. The Navy’s FORCEnet program is incorporating network-centric innovations that already have had an impact in the Iraq War.
War lessons direct course as a new architecture looms.

July 2004
By Maryann Lawlor