Geospatial Information Systems

July 31, 2015

WR Systems Ltd., Fairfax, Virginia, is being awarded a $25,194,253 ceiling increase modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee, competitive award contract (N65236-10-D-2839) to provide the U.S. fleet and U.S.-supported foreign military fleets with comprehensive programmatic and technical support for navigation and geospatial information systems. This contract is in its fourth and final option period. With this ceiling increase modification, the cumulative value of this contract would go from $140,601,392 to $165,795,645. Work will be performed in Norfolk, Virginia, and is expected to continue via award of the follow-on contract in September.

April 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

April 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

April 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

April 2012
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

 

The U.S. Army’s BuckEye system provides aerial coverage of the terrain in Afghanistan that is processed and fed into the GeoGlobe database.

Geolocation software continues to evolve.

May 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Commercial off-the-shelf products could provide warfighters with more complete battlespace picture, additional capabilities.

Continuously evolving visualization software now allows a host of commercial and military customers to tour a location in four dimensions without leaving the comfort of their desktop. Database and real-time imagery combined with user-friendly, dramatic formats enhance applications ranging from farmers assessing crops to the intelligence community viewing potential hot spots.

May 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

Rapidly growing private sector technology advances will feed government geospatial information needs.

The National Imagery and Mapping Agency is fielding a team of commercial companies to provide vital geospatial information services to military and civilian government customers. The goal is not only to rapidly obtain various products ranging from basic mapping to detailed geospatial imagery, but also to establish an extensive commercial base of geospatial information services and generate two-way technology transfer.

May 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Enhanced versions of established tools assist imagery customers inundated with information.

As satellite data volume swells and virtual environments appear on more desktops, knowledgeable commanders are making split-second decisions by relying on their experience. Soon they will have the support of smart systems replete with subject matter expert material that describes choices and their consequences.

March 2001
By Robert K. Ackerman

Multispectral data add versatility to high-resolution satellite imagery.

Sensor fusion is taking place within the commercial remote sensing arena as military users combine different forms of satellite imagery to generate advanced intelligence and mission planning products. This imagery also is being combined with data from diverse sources such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and topographical archives to redefine geospatial information.

March 2001
By Maryann Lawlor

Smile, you may be on space-based camera.

A combination of faster computing capabilities, lower cost storage and improved software is opening new markets for commercial satellite imagery in the 1-meter and, in the future, 0.5-meter resolution range. Although these images were once reserved for U.S. government and military uses, today a wide range of organizations is purchasing them to support their missions. From monitoring activity in other countries and creating accurate simulation models to mapping underwater environments, pictures taken from space have become a valuable tool and have ushered the world into what some have termed the age of transparency.

August 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
This view of Churchill Downs racetrack in Kentucky illustrates how the Spatial Templates for Emergency Preparedness, or STEPs, system allows users to underlay images beneath geospatial information data.
Industry, academia develop multifaceted command system.