October 1999

October 1999
By Henry S. Kenyon

A California-based firm is cashing in years of military communications experience to enter commercial markets.

Technology derived from military signal analysis work is producing testing equipment for wideband applications in the private sector. These devices are capable of both storing and analyzing large amounts of data while generating a variety of broadcast waveforms.

October 1999
By Henry S. Kenyon

Once a specialized niche technology, silicon-on-insulator chips will soon appear in a wide variety of applications.

New production methods allow constructing semiconductors capable of operating at a fraction of the power of existing devices while delivering comparable or superior performance. These new technologies could lead to extremely efficient electronic devices, from handheld computers to tactical radios and missile warheads. The potential also exists for increased processor speeds in both military and civilian communications and computing applications.

October 1999
By Fred V. Reed

Scientists pursue miniaturization of chips by substituting chemical reactions for silicon.

A radical approach to semiconductor fabrication may soon lead to supercomputers the size of wristwatches. Scientists are developing logic gates based on molecular oxidation that could allow these building blocks of computers to be constructed of only a few molecules.

October 1999
By Henry S. Kenyon

Off-the-shelf programs and hardware lend versatility and cost effectiveness to proof-of-concept forward air defense system.

The U.S. Marine Corps Command and Control Battle Laboratory experiment is using modular, easily configured software to achieve visualization and coordination of battlefield radar and communications data. This project provides a picture of ongoing efforts throughout the armed forces to create sophisticated battle management technologies. Designed as a testbed for future air defense and command and control systems, the battle laboratory combines forward-looking new concepts while providing an off-the-shelf hardware and software environment.

October 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

Scientists lay groundwork that offers security to unclassified systems.

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Sandia National Laboratories have developed a new encryption device that promises the security and bandwidth accommodation necessary to scramble various types of data at speeds unmatched by many other encryption technologies.

October 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Neural network software acts as early warning system to prevent equipment failures, predict business trends.

Sophisticated, pattern-recognizing artificial intelligence agents are solving quandaries faced by organizations that are being inundated by massive amounts of information. The design of these technodrones is based on the characteristics of structures that allow the human body to function. It enables systems administrators, both military and commercial, to monitor and pre-empt network catastrophes and allows corporate leaders to tap available data and take advantage of opportunities.

October 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

The alliance hopeful strives to modernize its defenses on a limited budget while downsizing its armed forces.

The former Warsaw Pact nation of Bulgaria is battling fiscal restraints and holdover communists as it strives to achieve its primary defense goal  of membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. The country is wrestling with cultural changes in its transition to a Western-style democracy with civilian control of its defense establishment. Military leaders once trained to operate in possible Warsaw Pact actions against the West now see the nation’s civilian leadership providing full support to alliance operations against its former allies.

October 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

International flavor of exercise compels participants to address standards, creates cooperative framework

October 1999
By Michael A. Robinson

Information technology leader refines focus, returns to its roots to pursue federal projects.

If anyone can explain the principles behind the flight path of a boomerang, it is Dr. Edward H. Bersoff. Not only is Bersoff president, chief executive officer and founder of BTG Incorporated, a leading information technology company based in Fairfax, Virginia, but he also holds a doctoral degree in mathematics from New York University and is a former U.S. Army officer assigned to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

October 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

An organization designed to support military campaigns now finds itself in the thick of information operations.

The National Security Agency is reorganizing its structure and activities to serve as a full-fledged participant in military operations. This break from its traditional role of providing support to decision makers and warfighters reflects the growing magnitude of information in military operations.

October 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Acquiring the latest plans of an adversary is no longer only the craft of undercover agents.

Intelligence-gathering techniques perfected by the government have made their way from the battlefield to the boardroom and now to corporate war rooms. These distinctively designed facilities are headquarters to a company’s team of specialists who provide decision makers with knowledge that is critical to corporate survival and growth in today’s highly competitive environment.

October 1999
By Lt. Gen. C. Norman Wood, USAF (Ret.)

The U.S. intelligence community must take the initiative in developing a broad, cohesive plan for national intelligence. This effort must encompass specific funding requirements, new sensor and collection systems, information architectures and centralized authority over the intelligence community.

The sense of urgency comes from the uncertainty that is characteristic of the post-Cold-War era. This includes the lack of a single, easily defined threat and the explosion of information throughout cyberspace. International coalition operations add new requirements for collection, processing and dissemination. And, despite budget surpluses, significant funding increases are unlikely.

October 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

Vast air campaign and real-time requirements impel development of new data products, delivery methods.

New data storage and retrieval techniques are allowing theater air mission planners to call up detailed imagery and mapping data from a laptop computer. Using commercial hardware and software, U.S. forces directed attack and rescue missions during the recent Kosovo conflict by accessing continentwide data contained in a single box.