October 2000

October 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

Military teams explore technologies outside the box and beyond the atmosphere.

Space may be the final frontier for travel, but for today’s earthbound warriors it is the enabler of systems that strengthen and speed operations. Recognizing that the military’s reliance on space-based assets will continue to grow, the U.S. Defense Department is seeking new ways for these resources to give its soldiers the advantage. No longer viewed as a luxury, the cosmos is now treasured as an intricate component of a successful mission.

October 2000
By Edward J. Walsh

Cutting-edge applications solve problems, extend warfighters’ reach.

October 2000
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Vikings set sail into the digital realm.

A new Internet protocol military encryption system from Norway is being targeted for marketing to Scandinavian and new North Atlantic Treaty Organization nations. Developed for Norway’s Ministry of Defense, this system provides end-to-end communications security using an Atlantic alliance algorithm and features a smart card removable cryptographic ignition key, operator password and tamper-proof protection.

October 2000
By Henry S. Kenyon

Software tool creates direct link from camera to monitor without format conversion or bandwidth delays.

The U.S. Defense Department has developed an imagery system that allows full-motion video inputs from unmanned aerial vehicles, handheld cameras and similar devices to move directly from a sensor to an analyst’s workstation. Based on recent advances in hardware and commercially available software, intelligence agencies can now capture and process uncompressed imagery in real time with sophisticated off-the-shelf products.

October 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

The race is on to make travel through the solar system routine.

Imagine being able to fly from planet to planet at a cost and safety level comparable to today’s flights from continent to continent. Work currently being conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration could make this a reality for future generations.

October 2000
By Henry S. Kenyon

System measures fighter’s electronic defenses against variety of real-world threats.

A powerful computer that generates thousands of radar signals is being used to test the electronic warfare suite on the F-22 Raptor. The device pushes the aircraft’s countermeasure package to the breaking point, allowing engineers to locate, analyze and repair faults in the system prior to installation.

October 2000
By Christian B. Sheehy

Communications connectivity remains a high command and control priority.

Over the past decade, downsizing in the U.S. Air Force has refocused the service’s goals on the efficiency, readiness and maximization of manpower and resources within a tighter budget. Restructuring the organization’s planning and allocation systems under a new program will ensure that the challenges of a rapidly changing global defense picture will continue to be met.

October 2000
By Lt. Gen. C. Norman Wood, USAF (Ret.)

There is no doubt that the United States has good intelligence capabilities. Our network-centric approach to warfare fits perfectly with intelligence collection and dissemination. Our collection assets are the best in the world. Expert analysts have proved their worth with decades of vital discoveries that helped stave off potential disasters during the Cold War. Yet, intelligence community leadership is faced with some important decisions to ensure its vitality and effectiveness in the coming decades.

November 2000
By Robert K. Ackerman

A re-examination of goals and capabilities is forcing the community to focus on human assets.

The defense intelligence community, flush with new collection and dissemination technologies, now faces a crisis in its human elements. Years of improving technological capabilities have left a serious gap in human intelligence collection as well as in analysis.

October 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

Data hunters and gatherers hone predictive skills.

October 2000
By Robert K. Ackerman

New commercial Web tools melded with internal expertise keep the secure intelligence network on top.

The World Wide Web’s commercial revolution is feeding new capabilities to Intelink, the intelligence community’s independent intranet. As usage increases and information grows exponentially, Intelink is adapting Web tools to serve the increasingly complex needs of a secure network.