Simulation and Tranining

February 2008
By Rita Boland

 
U.S. Air Force special operations crews use a variety of training devices, such as this C-130 simulator. Special operations forces aircrew and combat search and rescue aircrew are trained through the Aircrew Training and Rehearsal Support II (ATARS II) program.
Aircraft simulation and instruction enable troops to hit the ground running immediately after graduation.

February 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The U.S. Air Force’s Modeling and Simulation Training Toolkit (AFMSTT) enables the service to train its personnel for a variety of missions. The toolkit recently was modified to support joint and interagency operations in U.S. airspace.
Simulation tool allows government agencies to practice keeping the skies safe.

February 2008
By Rita Boland

February 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Army simulation features an unmanned aerial vehicle flying over Baghdad. The Army’s National Simulation Center (NSC) is producing new simulations to take the place of live training before soldiers deploy to Iraq.
Simulation experts move quickly to ensure accuracy for asymmetric warfare training.

March 2007
By Rita Boland

 
Simulation developers at the Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation are working on tools that soldiers can use from any location. Some simulations will allow soldiers to practice working in teams through networked computers.
Program office is making training more available and interoperable.

March 2007
By Rita Boland

 
Human behavior modeling can result in digital characters such as the ones in simulations and video games or in charts, graphs and reports that predict and explain actions. Accurately modeling humans is a difficult task because of the variables involved.
Developers strive to create accurate portrayals of behavior, believe breakthroughs loom.

March 2007
By Maryann Lawlor

July 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A scientist at the Naval Research Laboratory engages a virtual reality simulation in the laboratory’s VirtuSphere system. The user can walk, run, dart to one side or reverse direction physically as if he were moving in the real world.
Warfighter simulations employ varying technologies to emphasize different skills.

September 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

Information technology, modeling, security experience coalesce to produce networked interactive systems.

Engineers are applying information technology practices to create complex simulations that go beyond the reach of existing single systems. Extensive simulations that model large-scale military operations can be generated by networking established systems to produce data in near real time.

June 2000
By Col. Keith J. Wagner, USAF

Next-generation technology advances collaboration to support joint and coalition military missions.

July 2001
By Maryann Lawlor

Hands-on experience improves learning for sailors down under… the sea.

Submariners are being immersed in the latest in simulation technology to familiarize them with their future stations and duties. Hardware and software under development during the past few years have come to fruition, and instructors at the U.S. Naval Submarine School, Groton, Connecticut, are excited about the positive impact the new systems have in their classrooms. Students are so excited about training in this fashion that they actually refuse to leave when the final bell rings.

July 2001
By Maryann Lawlor

Focus moves from clever gadgets to warfighter needs.

The U.S. Defense Department’s prime modeling and simulation office is crafting a new master plan that focuses on warfighter needs rather than technological leaps. The plan is emerging from a reassessment of past accomplishments as well as requirements identified by the major commands.

July 2001
By Henry S. Kenyon

Synthetic environments provide cost-effective readiness tools, realistic battlefield situations.

The U.S. Army is developing cutting-edge simulation technologies that will allow soldiers to train in a variety of simulated environments. In partnership with the entertainment industry, the service is designing highly realistic and interactive instructional systems that blur the line between contemporary computer-based instruction and science fiction.

October 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

 

Lt. Cmdr. William Garren, USN, director, 2nd Fleet/Striking Fleet Atlantic joint operations center, briefs watch standers in the joint operations center onboard the USS Mount Whitney. The ship acted as the 2nd Fleet/Striking Fleet flagship during COMBINED JOINT TASK FORCE EXERCISE (CJTFEX) 04-2.

October 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 

A helicopter designed by developers of the online game America’s Army demonstrates the level of simulation fidelity possible using current technologies. Massively multiplayer online games such as this one may be the future of military simulation.

Dispersal rather than consolidation will guide advanced defense modeling and training.