November 2004

November 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

Researchers hunt for weaknesses in large node-based systems.

U.S. government computer scientists are studying how computer grids react to volatile conditions to understand how events such as virus attacks, sudden changes in workload and cyberattacks can affect linked groups of hundreds or thousands of geographically dispersed machines.

November 2004
By Randy Cieslak, Chief Information Officer, U.S. Pacific Command

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

November 2004
By James C. Bussert

 
Although Russian Sovremenny large missile destroyers are more than 20 years old, the models that China has purchased add state-of-the-art antisubmarine warfare (ASW) sensors and helicopters to the People’s Liberation Army Navy.
The People’s Republic takes a serious approach to undersea activities.

November 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

November 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

November 2004
By Robert Walter and George Duchack

 
The Adaptive Joint Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Node (AJCN) is a multimission radio frequency system that would provide seamless interoperable communications with signals intelligence, electronic warfare and psychological operations simultaneously.
Technology demonstration examines feasibility of a multimission system.

November 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The common operational picture (COP) of the northeastern United States on the High Resolution COP Display System includes all of the aircraft in the air at a specific time. Each airplane is tagged with an identifier and information about its heading, speed and altitude.
System helps clear the fog in area of responsibility.

November 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

November 2004
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

The lines between the tactical, operational and strategic realms of warfare are beginning to blur in large part because of technology. Investments in command and control have changed the character of the battlespace, and while some of the new capabilities provide commanders with more control than they ever envisioned, new challenges are surfacing that must be tackled. The command and control capabilities that deliver the benefits of network centricity have consequences that today’s military and government leaders must address in their transformational efforts.

November 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Air Force fighter aircraft, the F/A-22 Raptor, engages in future air combat in this artist’s concept. The aircraft is a key element in the Air Force’s future as a networked force.
Rapidly improving technologies are changing traditional tactical roles.

November 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Soldiers from the 57th Signal Battalion and A/111th Signal Battalion pull fiber through manholes as part of the work to improve the telecommunication infrastructure in Baghdad.
Military builds foundation for the future.

November 2004
By Adam Baddeley