February 2005

February 2005
By David E. Peterson

 
U.S. warfighters in the Coalition Operations and Intelligence Center in Camp Doha, Kuwait, monitor the ground war in Iraq. Computer-to-computer signals intelligence gathering could be used as another means to conduct intelligence-gathering and psychological operations.

Computer forensics offers new intelligence-gathering options.

February 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Expeditionary Tactical Communications System (ETCS) will provide U.S. Marines in Iraq and the Horn of Africa with a secure voice and messaging system. The ETCS uses the Iridium satellite network to connect warfighters with other units up to 200 nautical miles away.

New applications keep Marine units in touch and on the move.

February 2005
By Cmdre. Robert Howell, RN (Ret.)

 
Vice Adm. Richard Wilmot-Roussel, FRN, French representative to the Military Committee of the European Union, says the threats to the European Union are similar to those of most democracies.

February 2005
By Steve Cooper, Chief Information Officer, U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security became the 15th cabinet department in January 2003, consolidating 22 agencies and more than 180,000 people under one unified organization. Prior to creation of the department, no single federal department had homeland security as its primary objective. One can only imagine the challenges it faces as a brand new department in this age of technology. The department’s staff is confronted every day with building the enterprise architecture, developing its geospatial capabilities, enhancing its cybersecurity and improving its wireless technologies.

February 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Multimedia Art Processing System (MAPS) is designed to automatically translate and transcribe foreign media broadcasts for analysis. The system's translation software provides a rough translation of a broadcast. MAPS can translate up to six media feeds simultaneously and perform key-word searches through live and recorded broadcasts.

February 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

Analysts warn organizations not to buy into scuttlebutt.

Viruses, worms, hackers, spam, disgruntled employees, flawed software, terrorists—cyberspace is rife with danger, but defending information has some pitfalls of its own. Information security specialists are the front-line warriors in this battlespace, and they may be making important decisions about which weapons to use based on misconceptions often promulgated by security product vendors. Industry experts have taken a closer look at some commonly held information assurance beliefs and claim that many are little more than myths.

February 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Air Force F-16 drops flares as it patrols the skies over Iraq. New sensors, better datalinks and more bandwidth are turning individual aircraft into major nodes in an all-encompassing battlespace network. 

Every aircraft a communicator in future air warfare.

February 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
The E-10A will help define the future U.S. Air Force as a multifaceted network-centric force. Its sensor capabilities, which will migrate to other aircraft, will be vastly improved over existing systems. And, its ability to share data will be the linchpin of the Air Force's digitized battlespace. 

Progress may hinge on solving hardware and software challenges.

February 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The U.S. Defense Department is working with Space Exploration Technologies Corporation to develop a family of less expensive, more reliable launch vehicles. 

Concept changes the face and pace of military space-based asset deployment.

February 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
An HH-65 Dolphin stationed at Air Station Houston examines a ship inbound for the Houston Ship Channel. Patrolling from the air is one way the U.S. Coast Guard is incresing martime domain awareness (MDA).

Top-down intelligence will boost security.

February 2005
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

The attacks of September 11, 2001, changed Free World society forever. The terrorist slaughter brought home the concept that no oceans, no mountains, no national borders will deter evildoers from attacking innocents around the globe.

Free World governments responded to the terror tactics employed that day by increasing emphasis on homeland security, and among the first measures were efforts to strengthen commercial aviation safety. Everyone has seen the effect that homeland security is having on air travel, and certainly that is an important and highly visible function.

February 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
The Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police Department's Joint Operations Command Center, or JOCC, includes a wall of displays that can show informatoin ranging from three-dimensional simulated fly-throughs to live video feeds from around the district. On each side wall is a live radar feed from Reagan National Airport. 

February 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
An industry report by the Civitas Group LLC indicates that the market for homeland-security-related products and applications continues to grow. Consolidation among security service providers is driving much of this expansion. 

Firms attract customers with packaged service offerings, move away from stand-alone products.