April 2005

April 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon, Robert K. Ackerman and Maryann Lawlor

 
Tom Ridge, former secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), described the role information plays in homeland security and his experiences in establishing the DHS at AFCEA’s Homeland Security conference.

As the war on terrorism enters its fourth year, experts offer that the U.S. government can congratulate itself for successfully launching a number of bold initiatives to protect national security.

April 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

Leaders to discuss latest operational requirements.

Military and government decision makers convene at the Washington, D.C., Convention Center next month to discuss requirements in current operations and to explore hundreds of technical solutions. TechNet International 2005, which takes place May 17-19, will address the issues that commanders know from experience are real challenges facing warfighters today.

April 2005
By John J. Garing, Director for Strategic Planning and Information/Chief Information Officer, Defense Information Systems Agency

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

There are a number of emerging technologies and methods of applying them that will help the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) and the U.S. Defense Department as we build the foundation for network-centric operations, two of which are convergence and Web services. DISA is pursuing the acquisition of services and capabilities employing these technologies with techniques such as capacity-on-demand and managed services.

April 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

April 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The ghostly blue glow of electrically charged xenon gas radiates from a 50-kilowatt Hall ion thruster at NASA’s John H. Glenn Research Center. Scientists at the center are developing a variety of electric propulsion systems to efficiently propel spacecraft into the outer solar system.

April 2005
By David L. Fraley Jr.

 
Expectations for new capabilities tend to peak soon after a need is identified then fall significantly as soon as the challenges are identified.

Integration of new and legacy communications technologies demands safeguards.

April 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
The U.S. Army’s Every Soldier a Sensor (ES2) simulation uses computer game technology to teach soldiers how to perform as if they were sensors in an intelligence network. This screen shot shows a typical street scene in an urban environment where a soldier may have to interact with the local populace or deal with suddenly introduced situations.

April 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Command operations and intelligence centers supporting current operations depend on the services and capabilities the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) provides to improve warfighting processes.

Boosted bandwidth revolutionizes warfighting processes.

April 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The goal of the U.S. Department of Defense Public Key Infrastructure (DOD PKI) program is to develop and issue electronic certificates, or identity cards, to users and applications. These certificates protect wireless devices such as this tactical radio from being illegitimately used to access secure communications and data networks.

April 2005
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

April 2005
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

No one could possibly question the logic of using scarce U.S. Defense Department resources to fully fund the ongoing war on terrorism. If we can spend an extra dollar to prevent one of our military people from being injured in Afghanistan or Iraq, then certainly we should do that.

However, we must not lose sight of another need. We also must be mindful to ensure that supporting today’s readiness does not mortgage our future. This is not a new problem; it is one that the defense community always faces. Now, it has become especially acute as U.S. and coalition forces are engaged in combat overseas against a shadow enemy.

April 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The Blue Gene system, developed by IBM, has been installed at the ANL and will assist researchers and engineers with computations needed for more detailed simulations.

Computing capabilities to improve the scientific scale of problems tackled by a factor of 100.

April 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) is overseen by the Sandia and Los Alamos national laboratories and the U.S. Department of Energy. Its goal is to provide a multidisciplinary research environment for integrating nanoscience discoveries into practical applications such as microelectronics.

April 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman