April 2000

April 2000
By Michelle L. Hankins

Establishing internal and external guidelines remains top priority in network assurance.

To protect information systems from security breeches, organizations increasingly are embracing a comprehensive strategy that relies on both technology and enforced policies. Meanwhile, the legal system has been hard pressed to keep pace with information system protection issues, leaving many questions unanswered about how far businesses may go to protect their systems.

April 2000
By Michael A. Robinson

Extra revenues from expanded reach could total $200 million in two years.

Jim Robbins, the Harvard-educated president of one of the nation’s largest cable companies, was in southern California on a business trip when he decided to check his voice mail and got the stunning news that America Online had agreed to merge with Time Warner. The deal was not only the largest of its kind but one that promises to reshape how executives in a wide range of telecommunications businesses view the concept of convergence.

April 2000
By Robert K. Ackerman

A fast drop-in system provides long-distance communications among peacekeepers and their national headquarters.

Faced with a burgeoning humanitarian crisis amid a virtually nonexistent communications infrastructure, Australian peacekeeping forces worked with private industry to establish a broadband network in the heart of East Timor that included connectivity with other peacekeepers as well as their own national headquarters in Australia.

April 2000
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Army’s Land Warfare Information Activity provides model of profiling approaches to meet new hazards.

Creation of a national operations and analysis hub is finding grudging acceptance among senior officials in the U.S. national security community. This fresh intelligence mechanism would link federal agencies to provide instant collaborative threat profiling and analytical assessments for use against asymmetrical threats. National policy makers, military commanders and law enforcement agencies would be beneficiaries of the hub’s information.

April 2000
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

National Security Agency promotes information technology trials through protection profiles, flexible common criteria.

Uncertainty surrounding a patchwork of commercial information security products hurriedly placed in use on U.S. Defense Department computers and networks is reshaping policy. Successful test and evaluation of these products in specified laboratories will soon become a prerequisite for procurement by military services and defense agencies.

April 2000
By Henry S. Kenyon

Advanced technology, doctrine and infrastructure changes reflect service’s transition to network-centric warfare.

The U.S. Army is on the verge of deploying technologies that will enhance and extend the scope of information-based warfare by linking all echelons together. These devices and systems are part of a larger effort to assure future warfighters battlefield superiority.

April 2000
By Robert K. Ackerman

Rapid reaction communicators downsize equipment to increase deployment capabilities and reduce fielding time.

The U.S. Army’s mobile signal brigade is moving at a faster pace with smaller, more capable hardware that can be deployed rapidly into a theater of operations. The increasing propensity for diverse missions set in foreign lands is impelling the requirement for comprehensive communications systems that can be established quickly in unfamiliar, or even hostile, settings.

April 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

Customer service becomes a key deciding factor as consumers are offered more provider options.

April 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

Software turns gigabytes into megabytes, allows users to view kilobytes at a time.

As militaries, governments and businesses continue to struggle with the obstacles posed by bandwidth limitations, scientists in industry and research laboratories are improving compression technologies to allow high-quality images and text to be sent to the desktop—or palmtop—with phenomenal speed. The proposition is simple: Until scientists design a way to make the communications pipelines larger, engineers must make the volume of data smaller.

April 2000
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Nifty software tool automates federal agency spectrum assignment applications, avoids overlap, interference.

Powerful forces of private-sector competition and an onslaught of technical advances are propelling the United States into a telecommunications renaissance era. In every sector—wireless, wireline, local and long distance, video and Internet—more services are being delivered at lower prices and higher bandwidth.

April 2000
By Lt. Gen. C. Norman Wood, USAF (Ret.)

The future of telecommunications is being shaped by new usage trends driven by emerging technologies. These trends long have molded both military and civilian requirements.