June 1999

June 1999
By Fred V. Reed

Virtual National Laboratory races Moore’s Law, as minute circuitry requires increasingly careful design.

Extreme ultraviolet lithography, a technology being developed by a consortium of U.S. national laboratories and the semiconductor industry, is a strong contender to produce new generations of computer chips with features perhaps as small as 30 nanometers.

June 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Vendors focus on systems, applications interoperability to provide ideas for addressing common concerns.

A microcosm of the global information grid, the key to network-centric operations, will provide GovTechNet International ’99 attendees with a preview of the possibilities that military, government and industry cooperation will offer in the future. More than 20 companies and government organizations have joined forces to present an advanced technology demonstration designed to reveal how individual capabilities can convene in a single environment to offer end-users data and processes that help solve challenges.

June 1999
By Dr. Jude E. Franklin, Bruce B. Biggs and Darrell L. Ramey

Tomorrow’s capabilities could cut operator involvement in half and reshape the way battles are fought.

June 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Live video capabilities engaged by military intelligence units add to public safety arsenal for crime fighting, crowd control.

Military units and law enforcement personnel are employing the latest in integrated technology and real-time video transmission to conduct operations ranging from narcotics trafficking interdiction to search and rescue efforts. These mature yet evolving systems, used for several years to monitor the jungles of South America, are wending their way to new applications on the streets of Washington, D.C.

June 1999
By Fred V. Reed

Experiments underway could be the key to overcoming conflict on city battlefields.

Urban warfare concepts are receiving increased scrutiny through a series of U.S. Marine Corps experiments aimed at preparing the Corps for likely future missions. Participants in these experiments are studying the problems of urban conflicts and are identifying and developing new tactics, techniques, procedures and technologies that could prove useful on an urban battlefield.

June 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

Designers apply industry-standard components for smoother interfaces, rapid upgrades and easier use.

Integrated signal processors are the buzzword for new electronic warfare suites designed for adaptability across a broad range of threat environments. Embedding these commercial off-the-shelf devices in sea- and airborne signals intelligence platforms both increases interoperability and reduces the likelihood of rapid obsolescence.

June 1999
By David A. Brown

Facility develops electronic scenarios that closely duplicate battlefield, evaluating defensive systems against known and new dangers.

As a first point in the United States’ electronic combat test process, researchers strive to re-create electronic warfare accurately to challenge the effectiveness of hardware against hostile threats. A major link in this process is the U.S. Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator in Fort Worth, Texas, which can evaluate defensive systems against most known threats and can respond quickly to newly discovered threats.

June 1999
By Frank Colucci

Post-Cold-War widely varied emitters require more discriminating detection.

The U.S. Army is developing new countermeasures to defeat smarter air defense threats, including systems that rely on radar targeting technology. The recently introduced suite of tools detects, identifies, locates and jams modern gun and missile radars.

On the AH-64D Longbow Apache and other battlefield helicopters, radio frequency countermeasures offer protection in a threat-rich environment. On the Army’s digital battlefield, the technology promises to classify and target threats for a true joint force networked on the tactical internet.

June 1999
By Col. Alan D. Campen, USAF (Ret.)

The federal government needs help in defending the homeland.

Not since the second American revolution has the United States had to defend its homeland, yet the country is not much better prepared today than it was when much of Washington, D.C., was torched by an invading military force during the War of 1812.

June 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

Service providers, equipment vendors reposition as converged networks emerge.

Major advancements in Internet technologies are shaping the future of the telecommunications industry. The very real possibility of widespread use of voice over Internet protocol is affecting the market and the way service providers and equipment vendors are tooling for the future.

The industry is in limbo as telecommunications processes are evolving toward system convergence. As much as telecommunications experts believe the market will drive the technology, they are also aware that policies must be formulated to curb reckless technology development.

June 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

Specifications created to achieve interoperability, quality of service for users of emerging communications capability.

A European organization is heading a global effort to develop standards for an emerging market in telecommunications—voice over Internet protocol. Aiming to write specifications that will achieve worldwide acceptance among industry, administrators, regulators and other standards bodies, this group is gathering support from related organizations and experts in the field of Internet protocol telephony.

June 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

Partnership pursues cost-effective solutions to implement joint force instruction.

Distributed computer simulation training is bringing forces together and trimming instruction costs for North Atlantic Treaty Organization and Partnership for Peace nations. The worldwide military training moves 27 countries toward greater readiness and interoperability and prepares commanders and their staffs for humanitarian and peacekeeping operations.

June 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Creative thinkers learn from experts and each other to bring winning goods, services to virtual market.

Entrepreneurs aiming to take advantage of the opportunities the Internet offers are benefiting from a proven approach to fostering successful businesses. Affordable office space, venture capital and experienced mentors are helping the first wave of computer-comfortable visionaries realize their dreams while opening up a whole new world of alternatives to traditional marketing.

June 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

Company officials advised to take aggressive steps to ensure only legitimate programs reside on their electronic premises.

June 1999
By Lt. Gen. C. Norman Wood, USAF (Ret.)

Tradition permeates AFCEA International. Our roots are in the military, an organization that many affectionately refer to as “family.” And our heritage also stems from the government—the cornerstone of every country. Intertwining these two entities is industry that supports them, provides for them and depends on them. As we look toward the beginning of a new century, information technology has become the common language between these three organizations, and AFCEA has evolved into the conduit for communication.

June 1999
By Michael A. Robinson

Company making gradual shift from defense dollars to commercial markets.

Letting people know whether to expect rain, sleet or snow for tomorrow morning’s commute may not seem to have much in common with providing technological expertise for the Trident submarine, Minuteman missile or the space shuttle, but Evan Hineman has a way of pulling it all together.