October 2005

October 2005
By Dr. Susan Gragg, Chief Information Officer, National Reconnaissance Office

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

October 2005
By Michael A. Robinson

A billion here, a billion there, and you have a major government contractor.

George Pedersen always wanted to run a $1 billion company. When he started ManTech International Corporation on a shoestring budget several decades ago, the hard-charging executive knew achieving that level of market share would be a watershed moment for his fledgling enterprise.

October 2005
By Jeff Hawk

 
Sgt. 1st Class Lemmon Pitts, USANG, from Company A, Delaware Army National Guard 280th Signal Battalion, checks connections in the signal entrance panel of the single shelter switch during Grecian Firebolt 2005.
Tech-savvy Army reservists play essential role in integrating commercial solutions for military mission requirements.

October 2005
By Capt. James Coughlin, USAF

 
Construction of the new battle cab, part of the modernization and expansion of the Cheyenne Mountain Operations Center, is scheduled to be complete this month.
Mountain facility employs a new look for protection from foreign and domestic threats.

October 2005
By Jeff Hawk

 
A George Mason University (GMU) model could help the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) community gauge which assets are more valuable than others.
Models address the complex problem of assigning global intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance resources.

Two seemingly unrelated events occurred in May.

October 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

Planning and logistics system monitors readiness of units, equipment and individuals.

The U.S. Air National Guard is using a data mining and analysis tool to keep track of everything from jet engines to personnel qualifications. The software package allows users to access and compile information from a variety of sources, offering the ability to conduct high-level analysis or in-depth study of a specific unit’s readiness. The technology will soon enter service with the U.S. Army National Guard and U.S. Air Force Reserve.

October 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

October 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A Silkworm cruise missile easily could be concealed in a shipping container by terrorists who could launch it from the deck of a cargo vessel off the Eastern Seaboard of the United States. The country remains vulnerable to the threat of missile attack using asymmetrical means such as offshore merchant ships serving as launch pads.
Available technologies may offer a stopgap solution.

October 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
One of the ways the U.S. Army gathers and correlates intelligence information is with the All Source Analysis System, which tracks red forces through a variety of ground, airborne and space-based sensors. Officials are working toward standardizing access to these diverse data sources throughout many levels of command.
Stovepipe sensors and databases are enmeshed in the Web.

October 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
Sweden’s experience in developing network-centric systems has allowed it to create an infrastructure that will provide its air, land and sea forces with a unified picture of the battlefield.
Close government-industry partnerships are key to integrating advanced technologies into armed forces.

October 2005
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

October 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

October 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
For the U.S. Army V Corps, a team from the Joint Systems Integration Command installed the Command and Control on the Move (C2OTM) system on an M4 command and control vehicle (C2V). The hub is located in Heidelberg, Germany.
Commanders no longer have to choose between capability and mobility.