December 2005

December 2005
By Vice Adm. James D. McArthur Jr., USN, Commander, Naval Network Warfare Command

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

December 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Decisive docks at a port in Gulfport, Mississippi, and serves as a command, control and communications platform for the Mississippi Coastal Recovery Base Gulfport. The base provides assistance to local law enforcement agencies as well as search and rescue capabilities and humanitarian aid.
Hurricanes prove no match for the well-organized service.

December 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
MILCOM 2005 brought together leaders from industry and government to share new ideas to support warfighters and first responders. Held in Atlantic City, New Jersey, the conference drew a record number of attendees.
Leaders examine new ways to leverage technology to aid warfighters.

December 2005
By Col. Alan D. Campen, USAF (Ret.)

Officials were deprived of the tools to save their people.

The wind and waves from Hurricane Katrina had scarcely abated along the GulfCoast before Washington, D.C., itself was awash in pleas for inquiries into a failed disaster relief process. These were followed closely by legislative proposals for substantial changes in roles and missions in the departments of Defense and Homeland Security.

December 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
U.S. Army soldiers set out on a sunrise patrol in an east Baghdad neighborhood. The demand for actionable intelligence is growing as U.S. forces confront increasingly resourceful adversaries in urban settings.
More sensors generate more data for more options—if the message gets through to the troops.

December 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Members of the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit escort a speaker-equipped U.S. Army psychological operations high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle through the streets of Khas Oruzgan, Afghanistan, during operation Pegasus. One of the operation’s goals was to disrupt and deter enemy activity in the region.
Support teams provide joint force commanders with nonlethal warfighting options.

December 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Information Operations Technology Alliance (IOTA) is an online knowledge-sharing forum for the information operations community. One of the alliance’s goals is to provide a repository of technology solutions and expertise that warfighters can access.
Documentation aids analysis, operational decisions.

December 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

December 2005
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

December 2005
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

From its start as an adjunct to warfighting to its expanded role in all forms of military activities, the discipline of information operations has steadily increased in importance to the modern force. The concept has grown in size and scope, and it now finds itself occupying an important seat at the table of force projection. Yet this evolution did not come about without difficulty, and challenges still remain before the true effectiveness of information operations can be realized.

December 2005
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

December 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Chief Petty Officer Ron Banks, USN (l), and Senior Chief Adam Phillips, USN, familiarize themselves with the General Dynamics littoral combat ship (LCS) maritime information command center simulator. The simulator is being used to evaluate the center’s design and to help the LCS’ first crew learn about the ship’s interfaces.
Training transforms to meet needs of initial crew.

December 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
An aviation boatswain’s mate 3rd class signals for launch sequence preparation on the flight deck of the USS Kitty Hawk. The way the U.S. Navy conducts combat operations will change significantly as new network-centric architectures open up innovative capabilities.
Major efforts such as FORCEnet are only the bow wave of a radical new infostructure.