February 2006

February 2006
By Scott Charbo, Chief Information Officer, U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

There are two certainties in life that we all know: death and taxes. I submit that we add a third: Technology is ever-changing and evolving. If you don’t believe this, check your graveyard of cell phones and chargers.

February 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Combined Forces Center–Afghanistan (CFC-A) Joint Operations Center (JOC) is a state-of-the-art facility designed to accelerate and streamline commanders’ decision loops. It was developed to coordinate combat and security operations across the country.
Advanced headquarters unites technology and personnel under one roof to shorten coalition decision loops.

February 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

February 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The QuicLINK system is a lightweight cellular communications package designed for ease of use. Its equipment consists of a server housed in a rugged laptop and a radio node. The node can be mounted in a vehicle or carried by two people.
Adaptable nodes self-configure and carry data to the foxhole.

February 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
Adm. William J. Fallon, USN, commander, U.S. Pacific Command, gives his perspective on the vast Asia-Pacific region at TechNet Asia Pacific in Honolulu.
Some requirements mandate mission-specific gear.

February 2006
By Braun Jones and Nick Bundy

 
Unmanned aerial vehicles are used extensively in current operations and to some degree to patrol borders; however, size and power requirements may limit extensive use in homeland security efforts.
Federal investments advance national threat protection capabilities.

February 2006
By Robert Fonow

Threats to networking extend beyond virtual vulnerabilities.

In the United States, both corporate and Defense Department telecommunications have developed along a path of increasing complexity to support global geopolitical or commercial requirements. The paradox is that while this complexity improves the ability to support worldwide operations, the underlying network is becoming more vulnerable.

February 2006
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

 
The integration of systems and network operations is the focus in the Center for Innovation. The systems involved include warfighting platforms that project across a broad spectrum of requirements: intelligence gathering, missile defense, logistics, battle management and command and control.
Network-centric ingenuity powers robust idea factory.

February 2006
By Rita Boland

 

Photograph courtesy of NATO
NATO soldiers participate in exercise Urgent Quest at Salisbury Plain Training Area, part of the United Kingdom’s Army Training Estate Plain in the fall of 2005. The exercise gave allied warfighters conducting combined operations the opportunity to use advanced technology in the most realistic conditions achievable.

February 2006
By Maryann Lawlor

February 2006
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

The headline-driven controversy over the PATRIOT Act tends to obscure many of the key issues that buttress this important element in the war on terrorism. The Free World is facing an unyielding enemy that is using every aspect of Western society—from its liberties and protections to its technological infrastructure—to suit its twisted ideology that lauds mass murder of innocents. The United States faces a difficult task in that it must adjust its institutions and its way of life to prevent further mass casualties, but it must do so without destroying the very foundation of our 230-year-old society.

February 2006
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

February 2006
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) personnel use technology to screen and share operational data about its operations with airport personnel as well as other government agencies.
New policies and procedures address issues raised by inspector general report.