August 2006

August 2006
By Patricia Dunnington, Chief Information Officer, NASA

"Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?"

Throughout its nearly 50 years in existence, NASA has taken great pride in operating at the cutting edge of technology in conducting important exploration and research missions for the nation. Now, with its new strategy to lead the way in extending the presence of human civilization throughout the solar system—beginning with the return of humans to the moon as early as 2018 and leading to the eventual human exploration of Mars—NASA will certainly be counting on a number of advanced technologies to go forward with its exploration activities.

August 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The LightSpeed system converts optical equipment such as this U.S. Navy Big Eyes shipboard binocular system into communications devices. An add-on eyepiece attachment allows Big Eyes and other types of binoculars to transmit voice, video and data to another LightSpeed system.
Inexpensive, diode-based equipment permits covert transmissions for a variety of operations.

August 2006

 
Lt. Gen. Ulrich Wolf, GEA, the director of the NATO Communications and Information Systems (CIS) Service Agency (NCSA), leads off AFCEA Europe’s 6th annual Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) 2006 symposium and exposition.
But not all interoperability challenges are equipment-based.

August 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The U.S. Defense Department’s new memorandum on 802.11 wireless systems states that all wireless devices and networks connecting to the Global Information Grid must meet government security and interoperability standards.
Effort emphasizes standards compliance for acquisition of commercial systems.

August 2006
By Maryann Lawlor

August 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

August 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The goal of the U.S. Army’s BigDog program is to develop four-legged robots capable of following soldiers across any kind of terrain. Roughly the size of a large dog or small mule, the robot is intended to carry several hundred pounds of supplies and equipment to lighten troops’ loads in combat.
Quadrupedal packbot pushes boundaries of locomotion technology to tread where other machines cannot.

August 2006
By Adam Baddeley

 
The U.S. Army International Technology Center–Atlantic (USAITC-A) is leveraging technologies from Europe that can be quickly transitioned to support operations as part of the global war on terrorism. Its most recent focus is on capabilities that can counter improvised explosive devices.
U.S. Army technology center fosters communications equipment integration.

August 2006
By Col. Taylor Chasteen, USA; Maj. Cheryl Hynes, USA; and Lt. Col. Ken Blakely, USA

 
An Internet Café, sponsored by the 13th Corps Support Command in Balad, Iraq, has helped deployed warfighters keep in touch with family through e-mail since 2004. To keep this morale booster viable, however, the U.S. Army may have to make adjustments so that legitimate e-mail is not viewed as spam.
Nascent standard may disrupt U.S. Army e-mail flow.

August 2006
By Maryann Lawlor

August 2006
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

August 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Army captain radios a situation report during a raid on insurgents in Iraq. The U.S. Army is moving network technologies into the field as quickly as possible to support the warfighter while managing the implementation of its LandWarNet.
But complexities emerge as network support becomes crucial.