October 2006

October 2006
By Brig. Gen. Michael Basla, USAF, Director, Command, Control, Communications and Computer Systems, and Chief Information Officer, U.S. Transportation Command

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

October 2006
by Henry S. Kenyon

October 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

October 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
Lt. Gen. Steven W. Boutelle, USA, Army chief information officer/G-6 (c), discusses radio communications systems at LandWarNet 2006 with Gen. William S. Wallace, USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (l), and Brig. Gen. Randolph P. Strong, USA, commanding general of the U.S. Army Signal Center.
An agile foe requires flexible solutions.

October 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

October 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
The F-35A Joint Strike Fighter, christened the Lightning II, offers the pilot next-generation situational awareness from sensor fusion.
Advanced sensor fusion gives F-35 operators full knowledge of their environment.

October 2006
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company’s Advanced Development Programs sector is proposing a morphing wing design that can be locked into either an expanded or contracted position. Key to enabling this capability is the aircraft’s skin, which is made out of a shape memory polymer.
Morphing capability would offer flexible tactical options.

October 2006
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Part of the U.S. Air Force’s computer network defense efforts involve 67th Network Warfare Wing airmen monitoring Internet activity from a center located at Lackland Air Force Base. The wing falls under the auspices of the newly created Air Force Network Operations Command (AFNETOPS), Barksdale Air Force Base.
Reorganization boosts Air Force ability to fly and fight in air, space and cyberspace.

October 2006
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

It has been said that the two news items published most inside the Beltway are “operational successes” and “intelligence failures.” Nothing would please me more than to be able to list all of the positive developments in real intelligence collection and sharing that have occurred since the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004—but I cannot. However, the intelligence community, in the wake of this restructuring, has provided a greater glimpse than ever before of its goals and effectiveness. Unfortunately, the public seems aware of only those widely publicized intelligence failures.

October 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
U.S. warfighters are finding that human intelligence, or HUMINT, is more important than ever in the war on terrorism. The Defense HUMINT Management Office (DHMO) is working to produce new technologies to aid the warfighter in the quest for effective HUMINT collection and dissemination.
Trench coats have given way to optical collectors.