December 2007

December 2007

Many threats you can recognize instantly. For example, the drunk driver careening towards you, the group of armed men forming on a nearby rooftop, a snarling dog with its ears back or your sister-in-law and her eight kids pulling into your driveway. Well, maybe the in-law and her brood are not really threats, but at least you can see them coming. Cyber threats are more insidious. They can surprise you like high blood pressure or a spot inspection.

December 2007
By Cmdr. Gregory E. Glaros, USN (Ret.)

Having more ship program names than hulls in the water will not produce a better Navy.

December 2007
By Vinh Nguyen

Accountability and financial controls are part of the solution for cost-effective outsourcing.

The attacks on the United States in 2001 resulted in the intelligence community gaining tremendous power and resources to pursue U.S. adversaries around the world. Immediately after the attacks, the community began to augment its work force through rapid outsourcing, and this change in staffing led to new issues that had not been dealt with before.

December 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
Zephyr is a high-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) designed to
operate as a reconnaissance or communications relay platform. The solar-powered aircraft can remain on station for several days.
High-flying unmanned platform offers possibility of airborne radio relays and long-term sensing.

December 2007
By Kent R. Schneider

In an era in which commercial research and development dominates scientific progress, government research is important—particularly for the military. It is research in critical technologies that allows our national security structure to maintain the edge—to differentiate the United States from potential adversaries. This enables force projection, allows us to work more effectively with our coalition partners, and maximizes our force effectiveness while minimizing loss of life for the United States.

December 2007
By Cdre. Robert Howell, RN (Ret.)

Alliance members juggle interoperability, new missions.

Simulation and training, technology transfer and unconventional warfare were just a few of the topics discussed by a star-studded series of speakers representing some of the highest ranking officers from NATO countries. These leaders spoke at Allied Command Transformation’s (ACT’s) annual Industry Day 2007 (ID-07), held September 26-27 in Warsaw, Poland. For the fourth consecutive year, AFCEA International’s European office was responsible for administering the two-day event.

December 2007
By Cmdr. Danelle Barrett, USN; Boyd Fletcher; and Dave Huff

December 2007
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The rise in the number of technologies that demand their place on the spectrum calls for a balance among the military, federal government and commercial sectors.
Sharing a finite resource requires unprecedented cooperation.

December 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Marine from Marine Wing Support Battalion 372 adjusts his radio while on patrol in Iraq. Funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) aims to build on advances in cognitive radios to integrate communications and networking far beyond current capabilities.
Efforts aim to fill gaps in commercial technology development.

December 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
Developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory and marketed by Vital Alert Technologies Incorporated, the Through-The-Earth communications system allows miners, first responders and other personnel to transmit voice and data through hundreds of feet of rock, concrete, metal and debris.
System peers through the earth to allow rescuers to contact personnel in deep mines, buildings and subways

December 2007
By Rita Boland

 
A structural beam with surface cracks has been healed through supply of healing agent from the underlying vascular bed. In testing at the University of Illinois, surface cracks were repeatedly healed up to six consecutive times with no loss in healing efficiency.
Self-healing, self-cooling innovations could transform items used in an array of applications.

December 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A sailor climbs a ladder in a U.S. Navy maritime interdiction boarding exercise. New wireless technology offers improved safety and near-real-time information exchange from a boarding party on a target vessel to its base ship and Navy networks.
The network is extended to rubber dinghies at sea.

December 2007
By Rita Boland

 
The Common Submarine Radio Room (CSRR) system reduces the equipment footprint on a submarine through a combination of commercial technology and other novel features.
U. S. sea service introduces uniformity to submarine radio rooms.

December 2007
By James C. Bussert

 
Three new Type 022 Chinese missile boats lie at anchor in a shipyard. Two of the catamarans are painted in blue and white Chinese marine camouflage colors, which raises questions about the boats’ missions.
But the newest missile boats bear unusual markings.

December 2007
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The Naval Network Warfare Command (NETWARCOM) Maritime Operations Center monitors all of the U.S. Navy’s networks worldwide and supports the command’s information operations mission.
From protecting the networks to doling out intelligence, Network Warfare Command virtually sails alongside ships, submarines and aircraft.