August 2008

August 2008

On Cyber Patrol

Do you sleep well at night knowing your house and everything in it is safe? Have you installed the best door locks, burglar alarms and motion sensitive lights available? Is Spot, your Doberman/pit bull/wolf family pet awake, alert and a little hungry? Does your exterior resemble a bunker with siding that could withstand a category five hurricane? Then what’s that sound of something destroying your home? A possible answer: termites, the threat from within. Your mission critical data could be at as much risk.

August 2008
By Lt. Gen. Harry D. Raduege Jr., USAF (Ret.)

August 2008
By Rita Boland

 
These over-the-road trailer platforms are part of the Regional Emergency Response Network being put into place by the Florida National Guard. The network will enable interoperable communications among Guard members, first responders and other government and military personnel.
Florida, other state troops have a new network that is mobile, interoperable and quick to establish.

August 2008
By Kent R. Schneider

Cyber warfare. Critical infrastructure. Increased threat. Information assurance—or information security—is not the endeavor it used to be. The democratization of the Internet has had the same, albeit unwelcome, effect on criminal cyberspace activities. The extensive incorporation of information systems and networks into every facet of our lives has created a web of vulnerability across the spectrum of society. A threat can emerge from anywhere at any time in virtually any form.

August 2008
By Rita Boland

 
David Thompson, group president, Information Technology and Services Group at Symantec, one of the private companies invited to take part in IMPACT, cites the need for a public/private partnership to combat cyberterrorism.
A multinational partnership aims to establish international cooperation and information sharing in the battle against cybercriminals.

August 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Senior Airman Bernard Lee, USAF, Multinational Force–Iraq (MNF-I), plays the part of a contractor during a retinal scan demonstration at the MNF-I badging office. The scan is part of the security clearance and identification process for issuing official badges to contractors at the Ali Base in Iraq.
Automated processes target bottlenecks in current procedures.

August 2008
By Adam Baddeley

 
The Electronic Borders program is intended to extend the U.K.’s awareness of who wants to enter the country beyond its borders, even from nearby countries such as France.
Agencies both contribute to and access data consolidation.

August 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
Education and training are key tools to create skilled professionals such as these U.S. Air Force electronic warfare personnel.  Well-trained specialists are the first line of defense against various online threats to U.S. government networks.
Human capital is as important as software in cyber warfare.

August 2008
By Michael A. Robinson

Cyberspace heats up with both constructive and destructive activities.

Chalk it all up to Melissa, a computer virus that spread rapidly on the Internet and shut down entire e-mail systems. For both the computing public and the information security industry, the Melissa virus—named for a Florida lap dancer, of all things—was a huge wakeup call.

August 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

August 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

August 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

Business vulnerabilities are a serious threat to national security.

The business community may be both a back door and a front door to espionage activities that threaten U.S. national security. Hostile governments always have viewed companies that do business with their government as a possible conduit for valuable intelligence. But now that threat is extended to those companies’ own activities in the global economy.

August 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Army staff sergeant communicates with other forces while another soldier provides security during a mission in Iraq. Technologies introduced into Iraq and Afghanistan are changing the Army’s LandWarNet.
Technologies sent to Southwest Asia return to compel changes.