November 2008

November 2008

 

How many times have you seen this scene? A very nervous individual is at an airport’s lost and found asking if anyone has turned in a thumb drive. When asked what it looks like, he replies, “I think it was blue and the size of my thumb. The person behind the counter just shakes his or her head regretfully. Or possibly worse, the person pulls out a box of drives that all look the same. The number of scenarios for disaster here are almost endless.

November 2008
By Lt. Gen. Harry D. Raduege Jr., USAF (Ret.)

November 2008
By Charlotte Adams

 
John Grimes, the assistant secretary of defense for networks and information integration and Defense Department chief information officer, gives the opening address at the AFCEA Solutions Series’ Information Assurance conference.
Too many hazards, too many vulnerabilities, too valuable a target.

November 2008
By Henry Kenyon

 
The latest software upgrade of the United Kingdom’s Bowman tactical radio system will provide commanders with enhanced situational awareness, improved battlefield management tools, and battlefield networking and Internet capabilities.
Latest upgrade brings radio system’s key features online.

November 2008
By Michael A. Robinson

Federal unit joins huge telecom program following mergers and wireless gains.

Do not blame Don Herring if his business plan for the next decade seems simple at first glance. After all, the senior vice president in charge of AT&T Government Solutions believes he is poised to cement his division’s reputation as a key provider of federal information technology services with dozens of new civilian and defense contracts that could be worth billions of dollars.

November 2008
By Kent R. Schneider

Tactical communications have changed much over the years. This will not come as a surprise to anyone, but often we become caught up in the small, incremental shifts that occur each month or year and fail to recognize how fundamentally things have changed.

November 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman and Rita Boland

 
Lt. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sorenson, USA, U.S. Army chief information officer (CIO)/G-6, kicks off LandWarNet 2008.
Major communications elements deal with budgetary, cultural and technological issues.

November 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

November 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA’s) LANdroids program seeks to solve urban communications problems faced by warfighters. The program is creating intelligent autonomous robotic relay nodes that can be scattered by soldiers as they enter a building.
Smart, mobile nodes will configure, manage tactical voice, data links.

November 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

 
SOFs climb aboard a small submersible that affords covert transportation from a submarine to a landing zone.
Proposed experiment explores connectivity between submarines and special operations forces.

November 2008
By Paul A. Strassmann

Spending patterns show little movement toward fully shared enterprise services.

November 2008
By Rita Boland

 
U.S. soldiers in Southwest Asia are using the Handheld Interagency Identification Detection Equipment (HIIDE) to identify friends and foes in the tactical environment. The devices include iris, fingerprint and facial modalities.
Handheld, portable devices evaluate physical characteristics to help soldiers know the difference.

November 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Army sergeant communicates by radio with a tactical operations center as an Iraqi policeman stands by. Improved communications and networking equipment is pushing more data down to lower levels of operation in Iraq.
Yet power, weight, mobility and protection emerge as new issues.

November 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Pfc. Christopher Dubios, USA, terminates fiber as part of the fiber upgrade project at Forward Operating Base Gardez in Afghanistan. The 4th Brigade Combat Team’s Signal Company conducted the project in support of the 1-61 Cavalry.
Tactical connectivity leads to strategic gains.

November 2008
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

November 2008
By Rita Boland

 
The Rifleman Radio is part of the Joint Tactical Radio System Handheld, Manpack, Soft Form Factor program and will bring communications to the tactical edge using an ad hoc network.
Warfighters will use devices to keep in contact and transmit location data.