December 2008

December 2008

Armed conflicts throughout the ages have had days when no spear was thrown, no bullet fired, no missile launched. Even the Hundred Years War (Valois versus Plantagenet for the French throne – you remember) only had eighty or so years of actually fighting. We should be so lucky. The fact is we are now embroiled in a conflict with no end, no ceasefires, no time outs. This war is not a shooting war in one of the world’s hot spots. This unending struggle is in cyber space and will be a raging conflict until the last circuit board is fried.

December 2008
By Lt. Gen. Harry D. Raduege Jr., USAF (Ret.)

December 2008
By Kent R. Schneider

While information operations has been a priority to at least a small percentage of the global security community, it is becoming a mainstream discipline as part of the cyberwarfare initiatives now gaining precedence throughout government and industry. Recent experiences in Estonia and Georgia have convinced even the most skeptical person that cyberwarfare is a global priority and a significant combat multiplier.

December 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

December 2008
By Hamlin Tallent and Cameron Matthews

December 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The U.S. Marine Corps is providing the wireless point-to-point link (WPPL) system to its deployed forces. WPPL features secure point-to-point line-of-sight or non-line-of-sight transmissions for voice, data and video communications.
Mobile transmission equipment provides forces with increased bandwidth, connectivity.

December 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The new Marine One, the presidential helicopter, is one example of how the government adds military specifications to commercial products, causing cost overruns. It is estimated that the cost of the fleet of 28 helicopters has nearly doubled from the original contract amount.
Procurement environment calls for more personnel, training and options.

December 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman and Maryann Lawlor

 
U.S. soldiers with Combined Joint Task Force—Horn of Africa train in Djibouti. Building and deploying a joint task effectively and rapidly may become easier with the establishment of the U.S. Joint Forces Command’s Joint Enabling Capabilities Command (JECC).
Organization consolidates capabilities to respond to rapid deployments.

December 2008
By Rita Boland

 
The combat operations center (COC) capability set two shown here is the latest version of the centers. The new version is scheduled for delivery in 2010 and can accommodate 109 personnel. COCs are the cornerstone of future Marine Air Ground Task Force command and control. 
America's elite military branch focuses on standardization and easy integration for management and communications.

December 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

Government, industry team, look at military solutions.

The danger to the Free World’s information infrastructure has become more sophisticated and widespread, and it now poses a threat to the very economic well-being of the Free World. Economics and national security have become so closely intertwined that both now are facing common threats from global information operations.

December 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
Private-sector efforts, such as this Symantec security operations center, must actively support the government by protecting critical assets such as electric and gas grids to provide wider and more flexible national defense.
Shielding critical systems becomes everyone’s responsibility.

December 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The U.S. Army is developing new operational strategies for its forces to use in cyberspace. These plans will create new occupational specialties and restructure personnel formations to permit the service to operate as effectively in cyberspace as it does on land.
The U.S. Army redefines how it will fight in and across the electromagnetic spectrum.