June 2010

June 18, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

A factor as simple as purchasing desktop computers instead of laptop units may be a key clog holding back the flow of telework among U.S. federal government employees. A recent study has determined that only 23 percent of federal employees telework regularly or exclusively, compared to 64 percent of private-sector employees. And, 93 percent of federal employees state that being able to telework would make working for an organization more desirable.

June 24, 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

Interactive site provides the public with a responder's view of the oil spill.

June 15, 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Connections

U.S. government agencies fail to employ the policies that have been put into place to protect sensitive data when it is in transit, according to a recent survey of 200 government information technology (IT) and information security officials. Nearly three-quarters of IT professionals are concerned about file transfer security, but only just over half of them are monitoring file transfer protocol (FTP). However, subject matter experts state that by making a few changes and taking advantage of readily available technology, personnel could significantly enhance data security.

June 15, 2010
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

When the school bells ring for the first time this fall, one of them will be calling students—especially government employees—to explore cyber operations from a whole new vantage point. A brainchild of industry, the Art of Exploitation (AoE) University will feature a curriculum rich with hands-on computer penetration training, red teaming, vulnerability analysis, exploitation and forensic analysis.

June 10, 2010
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

Rarely does a week go by that doesn't include a military-sponsored exercise, experiment or demonstration. As participants ready for the event, excitement mounts. During the event, there don’t seem to be enough hours in a day to accomplish tasks as troops immerse themselves in the job at hand and the days fly by all too quickly. Usually, the purpose of these activities is to find out if a technology or a concept has merit. But as the event winds down and draws to a close, participants pack their bags, file their reports, shake hands with each other and return to their “real jobs.”

June 2, 2010
By Lt. Col. Patricia S. Collins, USA, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

One of the most significant challenges the U.S. commander in Afghanistan has faced is the technical capabilities needed for command and control. The commander has not been able to obtain the most current information at the right time to make the most timely, effective decisions. This has been largely because of the lack of a single, classified network that facilitates information sharing across all coalition partners.

June 15, 2010
By Helen Mosher, SIGNAL Connections

Low-Light Security Camera

June 15, 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Connections

June 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

The National Security Directorate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing technologies that could be used in tandem at personnel and vehicle chokepoints. The PNNL’s explosive-detection expertise results in multiple anti-explosives technologies that can be deployed in a range of uses.

June 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

June 2010
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr., SIGNAL Magazine

 

Lt. Gen. Steven W. Boutelle, USA (Ret.), Army chief information officer (CIO)/G-6, looks over Kabul, Afghanistan, from a plateau above the city.

Clear battlefield picture emerges from modern information technology for audio, visual, data.

June 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

This image depicts an array of 3 micron (µm) x 3 µm mirrors separated by gaps of ~200 nanometers. At this distance, the Casimir force is not negligible, and it can influence the performance of the devices.

If theory becomes reality, the result could be unprecedented efficiency in military and civilian applications.

June 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Within the next year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers Nickolay Lavrik (left) and Panos Datskos hope to reduce their bench-scale revolutionary chemical/biological sensor to a handheld instrument.

June 2010
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Magazine

June 2010
By Kent R. Schneider, SIGNAL Magazine

The U.S. fiscal year 2011 budget submission is in the hands of Congress, and information on defense budgets internationally provides clarity in the wake of the global economic crisis. At the same time, dialogue with government and industry has given us some insight into near- and mid-term direction. I want to share some of that information because the more we all understand probable trends and direction, the better we will be able to work together to provide the solutions needed going forward.

June 2010
By Linton Wells II, SIGNAL Magazine

 
Last Fall, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Administrator Craig Fugate asked a radical question: “How can we restore Internet connectivity to American citizens after a disaster?” Too often, he noted, the government treats citizens after disasters as victims instead of as sentient creatures who could solve many of their own problems if given the tools. 

June 2010
By John S. Kostoff, SIGNAL Magazine

 

The Joint Training and Experimentation Network (JTEN), a persistent global network, provides realistic joint training capability for combatant commands and services across the continental United States and abroad. The JTEN has been enhanced through the Tactical JTEN (TAC JTEN) concept, which uses a mobile communications package to extend the network to austere locations.

June 2010
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Magazine

 

The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Farragut disables a suspected pirate skiff. The ship is part of Combined Task Force 151, which conducts anti-piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden.

June 2010
By Henry S. Kenyon, SIGNAL Magazine

 

The U.S. Army Research and Technology Protection Center (ARTPC) originally was founded to identify and protect critical technologies associated with the Future Combat Systems (FCS) program. The ARTPC since has expanded its mandate to help program executive offices and program managers protect other Army information.

Pages