May 2012

May 30, 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

More cyber attacks launch from within the United States than anywhere else according to the latest threat report from McAfee, but the implications of the statistics are less obvious than they appear. Cybercriminals from other nations are routing their aggression through vulnerable U.S. Internet protocol (IP) addresses because outdated domains make easy targets. So while the country might not be the biggest breeding ground for hackers, its infrastructure has troubling weaknesses.

May 24, 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

The U.S. Army is making good on the mantra "train as you fight" by connecting units in garrison with the same mission command systems they use during deployments. Breaking through the bureaucracy inherent in putting these tactical technologies on a strategic network means that soldiers will be better prepared for their work in theater.

May 11, 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

In recent weeks, federal officials have alerted the operators of natural gas pipelines that their computer networks have been the targets of a series of cyber attacks.

Officials with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security confirm that their Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team, along with the FBI and other agencies, have been working with pipeline companies to answer the threats.

May 15, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

Few people have the nerve to take on huge tasks and the stamina to see them through, but Master Sgt. Paul Kammerman, USAF, certainly is one of them. From 19 years of marriage to 22 years in the U.S. Air Force to traveling on foot more than 37 miles in eight hours in Sarzana, Italy, Master Sgt. Kammerman demonstrates a stick-to-itiveness that truly is commendable.

May 15, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

They take time, money, staff and expertise, and in the end, they may not even pay off—and if they do, the profit margin may be very small compared to other projects. Despite all of this, one expert believes that responding to requests for information (RFIs) is actually one of the best ways companies can influence government acquisition.

May 15, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

May 3, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

 Hard and fast objects form the foundation for the Pentagon’s newest effort at a C4 enterprise.

The U.S. Defense Department’s Joint Information Enterprise (JIE), launched by the Joint Chiefs of Staff Operational Deputies, will be built on “five big rocks,” according to the assistant to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Vice Adm. Harry B. Harris Jr., USN, told the audience at the AFCEA NOVA Naval IT Day on May 3 that big rocks must serve as the foundation so that little rocks can be implemented atop them.

May 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

 

A Eurofighter Typhoon flies over Abu Dhabi. The Eurofighter, designed by a multinational consortium of aerospace companies, may be just a harbinger of future European defense activities. Budget constraints almost certainly will require that European nations pool and share resources for future system development and procurement.

May 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

 

 

A pair of French helicopters prepares to take off from a forward operating base in Afghanistan. The Eurocorps is looking to lead the way to developing a rapid deployment capability that can configure multinational units into a coherent force that can operate across national lines.

May 2012
By Kent R. Schneider, SIGNAL Magazine

 
The command, control, communications and computers (C4) technology community has undergone a great deal of change over the past couple of years. The U.S.

May 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

 

A U.S. Marine Corps sergeant communicates position information while on patrol in Helmand province, Afghanistan. The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is striving to replace service-oriented standards with joint requirements to improve interoperability and technology innovation.

May 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Magazine

May 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

May 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

The U.S. Defense Department’s "Joint Operational Access Concept" (JOAC) addresses the threat of future enemies using anti-access/area-denial capabilities to prevent U.S. forces from operating freely in combat theaters. Preparing in advance to thwart these activities and projecting force will increase U.S. successes during forthcoming battles.

May 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

May 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

May 2012
By Paul A. Strassmann, SIGNAL Magazine

 
Any aggregation of computers, software and networks can be viewed as a “cloud.” The U.S. Defense Department is actually a cloud consisting of thousands of networks, tens of thousands of servers and millions of access points. The department’s fiscal year 2012 spending for information technologies is $38.4 billion. This includes the costs of civilian and military payroll as well as most information technology spending on intelligence.

May 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Nellis Air Force Base, just outside of Las Vegas, Nevada, hosts the largest solar array on any U.S. military facility. It is capable of generating 14.2 megawatts of electricity.

Hurdles exist to harnessing the sun, but bright spots still can be found.

May 2012
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

May 2012
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

 

The CH-47 Chinook helicopter, which has been used for decades to transport troops and supplies across the battlefield, potentially could fly without a crew if the Autonomous Aerial Cargo Utility Sensor System (AACUS) is installed.

Future unmanned helicopters will replace deadly logistics convoys.