Cyber

June 20, 2018
By Jane Melia
Cybersecurity trends so far this year include a stern reminder that the threat of nation-sponsored cyber attacks cannot be ignored. Credit: TheDigitalArtist/Pixabay

With the arrival of June, we’re at the halfway point of an already busy year for the cybersecurity industry. With each passing year, our sector continues to demonstrate its evolving approach to fighting cyber threats, as cyber crime itself continues to evolve.

As both business and government move forward with digital transformation initiatives to improve processes and efficiency, the overall security attack surface continues to expand with more potential points of access for criminals to exploit. However, our industry is tackling these challenges head-on, with numerous innovative solutions continuing to come to market.

June 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers

When National Science Foundation officials announced in February that three major providers of cloud computing were donating up to $9 million collectively for big data research, they already were looking for ways to broaden the effort to include a wider variety of topics, including cybersecurity. The expansion is intended to benefit both research and education initiatives and is necessary, in part, because the cloud providers now acquire cutting-edge hardware before it is made available to researchers.

June 1, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
While the U.S. Army is working on significantly upgrading its situational awareness system Blue Force Tracking, in use on more than 98,000 platforms, its cyber situational awareness needs improvement, especially in red and gray zones. Army photo

The U.S. Army’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, known as CERDEC, is gearing up to face increasing asymmetrical threats in cyberspace. The center looks to improve cyber operations, information warfare, electronic countermeasures and information security, among other areas. Its efforts are prompted as the military finds itself fighting or preparing to fight more and more in cyberspace, in conjunction with the traditional domains of sea, air, land and space.

June 1, 2018
By Jane Melia
Credit: Den Schrodinger/Shutterstock

The potential geopolitical consequences of quantum communications will result in clear asymmetries in both knowledge and confidentiality of information. Countries whose data can be protected through quantum communication techniques will have a significant information advantage, a situation that would have important, albeit hard to predict, effects on geopolitical developments.

May 8, 2018
By Seli Agbolosu-Amison
Four policies give government agencies they flexibility and authority to limit cyber risks. Credit: katielwhite91/Pixabay

As a result of recent federal legislative and administrative activity, government agencies are expected to launch significant modernizations of their cybersecurity systems, get offensive with hackers and take a more strategic approach to risk. Combined, these policy directives promise to transform our government into a robust digital society, gaining greater resiliency to cyber threats by leveraging opportunities while reinforcing standards and procedures.

Here’s a breakdown of the key components of the four policies:

May 31, 2018
By Paul Parker
After enjoying a period without peers, the U.S. now find itself facing a variety of threats, including Russia, China and terrorist groups. Credit: TheDigitialArtist/Pixabay

The days of the United States’ stature as a force without equal appear to be over. The threat of near-peer competition with increasingly sophisticated adversaries is growing. As Secretary of Defense James Mattis says in the National Defense Strategy, "America has no preordained right to victory on the battlefield."

June 1, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Sailors assist with the landing of a Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter on the deck of the U.S. Navy’s USS Wasp assault ship as part of an April certification exercise in the Philippine Sea. In its role of steering the Navy toward the best information technology for the 21st century, the Space and Naval Warfare  Systems Center (SSC) Atlantic is looking at cloud computing systems to support the warfighter. Credit: Petty Officer 3rd Class Levingston Lewis, USN

This month is a crucial time for the U.S. Navy, as far as information technology goes. Its Program Executive Office for Enterprise Information Systems is developing the request for proposal for its Next Generation Enterprise Network Re-compete contract that will provide information technology services, including cloud services, for more than 700,000 Navy and Marine Corps users.

May 23, 2018
By Julianne Simpson
“Russia is not a resurgent power. Russia is a remonstrate power,” said Gen. Michael Hayden, USAF (Ret.), principal, the Chertoff Group, during his morning keynote at the AFCEA/GMU Critical Issues in C4I Symposium.

Gen. Michael Hayden, USAF (Ret.), principal, the Chertoff Group, shifted the weight of the conversation at the AFCEA/GMU Critical Issues in C4I Symposium from the direction of cyber narrowly defined to information broadly defined. Throughout his morning keynote he touched on Russian manipulation of the 2016 election, the U.S. moving into a post-truth culture and what cyber leaders can do in the future to help secure the nation.

May 30, 2018
By Don Maclean
Although hacking back against cyber criminals may seem morally justifiable, it can quickly spiral out of control. Credit: TheDigitalArtist/Pixabay

Whether a Social Security number from an individual, or financial information from a company, hackers continue to find ways to steal data from millions of Americans. To combat these crimes, the idea of active cyber defense has arisen on Capitol Hill with the introduction of the Active Cyber Defense Certainty (ACDC) Act.

In January, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen voiced measured support for empowering companies to be more active in their approach to cybersecurity. These active measures would allow companies to access other computer networks in order to thwart cyber attacks, monitor the hackers, collect evidence or destroy stolen files.

May 22, 2018
By Julianne Simpson
During her morning keynote, Stempfley stressed the importance of using analytics to create situational awareness in cybersecurity.

Situational awareness is key to cybersecurity and using analytics can help create the situational awareness needed to defend the nation from adversaries. “Never before have we had the tools that we have today to understand the environment we’re in,” said Roberta “Bobbie” Stempfley, director, Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute, CERT Division, during her morning keynote at the AFCEA-GMU Critical Issues in C4I Symposium.

May 17, 2018
Kimberly Underwood
Panelists discuss partnerships in cyber warfare at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

Thoughts by experts about the ability of the military to defend cyberspace are centering around the concept of improved partnerships, which may be outside of the Defense Department’s usual practices. A lot can be gained from the insight of coalition partners and think tanks—wisdom and information that the DOD may not have tapped into, experts said.

May 17, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Panelists at the Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium discuss directing change to organize the cyberspace warfighting domain.

Providing an information network that enables warfighters to perform global missions is not easy given the network itself is besieged constantly by cyber attacks. All U.S. Defense Department organizations use the complex technical infrastructure known as the Department of Defense Information Network (DODIN), and the responsibility to protect it 24/7 falls squarely on the shoulders of Joint Force Headquarters–Department of Defense Information Network (JFHQ-DODIN).

May 17, 2018
by Kimberly Underwood
Mark Russinovich, chief technology officer, Microsoft Azure, discusses machine learning at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

Machine learning has advanced to the point where more sophisticated methods can be more effective at cyber event detection than traditional methods, an expert says. Along with emerging methods, access to large amounts of “fresh” data is important for processing, determining trends and identifying malicious activity.

Teams looking at how to use machine learning need to consider different methods, suggested Mark Russinovich, chief technology officer, Microsoft Azure, at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) in Baltimore on May 17.

May 16, 2018
By Kaitlyn Cotter
Panelists discuss STEM education and training cyber warfighters during a panel at the Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

Raising the bar for STEM education comes through practice, competition and a culture shift to help prepare the next generation of defense leaders. It’s less about how many hours of STEM courses or what is the right age to engage kids in STEM and more of a focus on how to create access to opportunities in a way that they can connect with for the long term.

May 16, 2018
By Beverly Cooper
Panelists discuss women in the cyber workforce during a session at the Defensive Cyber Security Symposium.

Between 1.5 and 3 million cyber professionals will be needed worldwide by the year 2020 according to various studies. However, the majority of individuals currently entering the field are male; estimates are only 5 percent to 11 percent of professionals entering technical fields are women on a global basis. It is critical to bring more women into cyber fields not only to fortify the cyber workforce with more talent but also to apply the power of diversity that leads to better solutions.

May 16, 2018
by Kimberly Underwood

Faced with unending cyber attacks that are increasing in sophistication and coming from all types of adversaries, the U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence is preparing its best defense: cyber operators. With a dedicated section of the Army’s force that focuses only on cyberspace operations, the service must continue to fill the ranks and train cyber operators, said Maj. Gen. John Morrison Jr., USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence (CoE) and Fort Gordon.

May 16, 2018
By Beverly Cooper
Credit: Shutterstock

If you think of the cyber threat as Godzilla, you can see the need for a framework that optimizes limited resources. As the beast attacks the building, those individuals located on the ground floor—for example the architects and engineers—worry about being stepped on by its feet. Those on the next floor up, the systems engineers, see the knees and want protection from being kicked. The next level, the incident responders, see the claws and worry about what those claws can do. Higher in the building, the operators see the shoulders and are focused on how big the threat might be based on the shoulder size. The customers at the top only see teeth and flames.

May 15, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Anthony Montemarano, executive deputy director, DISA, speaks at the Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

As the Department of Defense is working to improve lethality, it is making the transition to fight in the new domain of cyber, according to Anthony Montemarano, executive deputy director, Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA). The key to this evolution is innovation and harnessing emerging technologies to protect and defend the homeland. “We’ve got to get ahead of the adversaries,” he said.

Speaking to a room packed full of industry and government officials on Tuesday at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) in Baltimore, and in an interview with SIGNAL Magazine, Montemarano called on industry to provide innovation.

May 15, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Vice Adm. Nancy Norton, USN, DISA director and commander of JFHQ-DODIN, speaks at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

In her unique, dual-hatted role as director of the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) and commander of the Joint Force Headquarters–Department of Defense Information Network (JFHQ-DODIN), Vice Adm. Nancy Norton, USN, is pushing to provide the best communication and information technology capabilities to the Defense Department (DOD).

“Everything we do is to support the warfighter and increase their ability to accomplish their mission,” she said. The admiral was the keynote speaker opening the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium (DCOS) in Baltimore on May 15.

May 1, 2018
 

As the need for more sensor processing and embedded security continues to grow in defense applications such as unmanned systems and munitions, the footprint for these mission-critical systems continues to shrink. A fundamental shift in microelectronics design and packaging is required to address the needs of the modern threat environment where non-invasive attacks are imminent.

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