Cyber

August 11, 2017
By Kimberly Underwood
Members of the Army National Guard, Air National Guard, Army Reserve and civilian agencies prepare to engage in cyber attacks as part of the recent Cyber Shield 17 exercise at Camp Williams, Utah. The cyberthreat’s borderless nature is bringing together experts from several nations at this year's Department of Defense Intelligence Information System (DoDIIS) Worldwide Conference in St. Louis.

The menacing threat of cyberwarfare is pulling together international military leaders in an effort to combat global electronic attacks.

Commanders from key military intelligence posts—including allied commanders from the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom—will tackle the seemingly unconstrained risks from cyber criminals at an upcoming forum hosted by the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA). The DIA’s Department of Defense Intelligence Information System (DoDIIS) Worldwide Conference will be held August 14-16 in St. Louis.

August 10, 2017

Cybersecurity solutions company Comodo has launched a new research service called Comodemia for university, government and nonprofit educators and researchers. It gives users access to the Comodo Threat Intelligence Laboratory's cybersecurity data repository, one of the largest in the world.

Comodo's threat data comes from millions of endpoints in more than 220 countries. In the first quarter of this year, the lab detected and cataloged more than 25 million malware incidents. By the second quarter, the total grew to 97 million incidents as the company expanded its research program.

August 10, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Maj. Gen. (P) Bruce Crawford, USA, the Army’s chief information officer/G-6, speaks at TechNet Augusta.

The network the Army has is not the network it needs to confront the changing face of warfare, says Maj. Gen. (P) Bruce Crawford, USA, who took over as the service’s chief information officer/G-6 nine days ago.

Gen. Crawford told the AFCEA TechNet Augusta audience the service confronts a confluence of strategic circumstances, with several major efforts all coming together at the same time. Those circumstances include the evolution of the threat, global instability that creates greater demand for ground forces, the rapid pace of technology evolution, the speed at which decisions must be made on the battlefield and emerging doctrines.

August 10, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Panelists discuss network modernization at TechNet Augusta 2017.

U.S. Army officials who play various roles in modernizing the network say doing so offers multiple benefits, including saving money, improving cybersecurity and offering greater flexibility on behalf of warfighters.

The officials made the comments while serving on a network modernization panel on the final day of the AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2017 conference.

August 8, 2017
By George I. Seffers

The Army’s first doctrine for fighting in the cyberspace and electronic warfare domains already is changing the way the service operates, said Maj. Gen. John B. Morrison Jr., USA, commander, Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Gordon, told the AFCEA TechNet Augusta audience in Augusta, Georgia.

August 4, 2017
By David E. Meadows
Money comes in many forms. Are paper bills or checks the safest way to pay? (U.S. Army photo by Kristen Wong)

In 2005, NBC News reported that the use of checks to pay bills was declining and that the majority of people writing them were old geezers such as me. That year, the Federal Reserve reported that an estimated 36 billion checks were written, with more than half of those paper checks written by consumers.

I’m a consumer and a baby boomer—an individual born between mid-1946 and mid-1964. Writing a check is something we boomers do. I was taught in 1965 in high school how to write checks, balance a checkbook and keep track of my bank account. It was a classroom activity.

August 2, 2017
The DHS Science & Technology Directorate has announced the transition of a new malware analysis tool to the commercial marketplace.

REnigma, a program designed to analyze malicious software, has spun off from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory to create startup Deterministic Security LLC. The Oregon-based company was founded to further mature the technology into a commercially available product and work with early adopters, focusing on incident response for government organizations and large enterprises.

August 1, 2017
U.S. Air Force students use a tablet for training and education. The Defense Information Systems Agency is supplying tablets to senior leaders under the one-year pilot program.

The Defense Information Systems Agency is expanding its offerings under the Department of Defense Mobility Classified Capability-Secret (DMCC-S) Program through a new pilot program that puts 8-inch tablet computers into the hands of designated senior leaders across the department.

The pilot expands the DMCC-S' support for smartphones and acknowledges the need to enable leaders to work with classified data in a mobile environment just as they would in an office. 

August 1, 2017
By Lt. Gen. Robert M. Shea, USMC (Ret.)

Possessing the ultimate weapon, the infantryman, the U.S. Army now is marching foursquare into cyberspace and electronic warfare operations. It is doing so not as a latecomer to the digital fight, but as one of the thought-leading pioneers in a rapidly expanding, cohesive domain.

The ground service, along with the other services, is integrating cyber, electronic warfare (EW) and other elements of information warfare into combat operations to more effectively assimilate information age technology. The effects of cyber and EW can move at the speed of light. They can enable or inhibit each other depending on how they are used, so it is only natural that these aspects of warfighting are tightly bound.

August 1, 2017
By Don Maclean

Cybersecurity is a human problem. Bad people use good technology for the worst purposes. Good people sometimes simply make mistakes or take inappropriate shortcuts. In the unfolding, complex cyber ecosystem, nowhere does human meet machine more directly than with identity and access management, or IAM.

Yet this direct connection is fraught with risk. Everyone must log in, but no one wants a lengthy process. Consequently, the more that IAM is automated, the more that people—who pose the weakest link in the cyber realm—are removed from the equation. Herein lies the problem: The easier processes become for users, the more complicated processes become for systems themselves.

August 1, 2017
By Robert K. Ackerman
A soldier with the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade sets up cyber tools at the National Training Center as part of the U.S. Army’s cyber electromagnetic activities (CEMA) initiative led by Army Cyber Command. The service is consolidating electronic warfare and cyber training and operations at Fort Gordon, Georgia, facilities to integrate all aspects of the disciplines.

The U.S. Army is consolidating major electronics disciplines in an approach that brings education and operations under a single umbrella. This confluence extends to physical plants as well as organizational charts. For example, the Cyber Center of Excellence at Fort Gordon, Georgia, is co-located with its operational counterpart to meld the identities of theory and practice.

July 27, 2017
By Richard Thieme

The mind of society is the battlefield in the current global struggle for geopolitical domination. The uses of soft power dominate in this battle and information warfare is the name of the game—not “cyber war” in all the ways it has been described but the influence and ultimately control of individual minds that, like cells in a body, make up the Mind of Society. Then control is used as leverage to achieve objectives that are often hidden.

June 29, 2017
By Sandra Jontz
U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley, USA, visits soldiers serving with the cyber electromagnetic activities (CEMA) support to corps and below (CSCB) team, 780th Military Intelligence Brigade, in May at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, California. Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Chuck Burden, USA

The U.S. Army is serious about the narrative that it is serious about cyber. The service has put its organizational architecture on the line by prioritizing the newest warfighting domain while converging it with long-extant but re-emerging combat disciplines, a senior leader says.

July 21, 2017

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) has awarded Salt Lake City-based startup Evernym a $749,000 Small Business Innovation Program (SBIR) award to develop an easy-to-use, decentralized mechanism for managing public and private encryption keys needed for the secure and scalable deployment of blockchain technologies.        

July 21, 2017

Officials with the Institute for Cybersecurity at Regent University recently announced the school is building a state-of-the-art cyber range training facility at its Virginia Beach campus. The Regent Cyber Range will open o during the fourth quarter of this year and will offer hands-on training programs for enterprises, consultancies, government and military organizations.

July 20, 2017

The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) opened the Army Cyber-research Analytics Laboratory (ACAL) on July 19, a facility that unlike any other lab, provides industrial and federally-funded partners—including universities—access to highly-sensitive live cyber-security data, the service has announced.

The new research space was developed as a result of a partnership with Army Cyber Command and represents an extension of ongoing collaborative efforts with the Defense Department’s science and technology community, said Philip Perconti, ARL director.

July 13, 2017
In late October, companies will have the opportunity to present cyber solutions to the U.S. Defense Department's Rapid Reaction Technology Office.

The U.S. Defense Department’s Rapid Reaction Technology Office (RRTO) will conduct a solutions meeting in late October in McLean, Virginia, according to a recent announcement posted on the FedBizOpps website. Companies will provide short technical presentations to government representatives about their technologies and products with the potential to be selected for pilot projects or experimentation if the technology appears to match the department's cyber needs.

The RRTO is interested in:

June 29, 2017
By Adam B. Jonas

On the eve of last year’s U.S. presidential election, two computational social scientists from the University of Southern California published an alarming study that went largely unnoticed in the flood of election news. It found that for a month leading up to the November vote, a large portion of users on the social media platform Twitter might not have been human.

The users were social bots, or computer algorithms built to automatically produce content and interact with people on social media, emulating them and trying to alter their behavior. Bots are used to manipulate opinions and advance agendas—all part of the increasing weaponization of social media.

June 29, 2017
By George I. Seffers
U.S. Army officials assessing cutting-edge cyber and electronic warfare capabilities during Cyber Quest 2017 tout the ingenuity of soldiers participating in the exercise.

U.S. Army officials expect that by this fall, they will have formal approval of a rapid prototyping process for acquiring cyber and electronic warfare prototypes assessed during the just-completed Cyber Quest 2017 exercise at Fort Gordon, Georgia.

Army officials describe Cyber Quest as an annual cyber and electronic warfare exploration and collaboration event hosted by the Cyber Center of Excellence. This is the second year for the event.

July 1, 2017
By Maj. Gen. Earl D. Matthews, USAF (Ret.)

In business as in life, whenever something goes terribly wrong, there is a reflexive tendency to start talking about what should have been done and to affix blame instead of focusing on how to move forward successfully. Cyber attacks are certainly no exception.

I simply WannaCry.

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