Cyber

July 31, 2014
By Jessica Gulick

Innovation comes in many forms. From gradual evolution or through disruptive processes; as a result of revolutionary thinking or from a confluence of ideas from different entities that share a common goal. Today, we’re seeing more and more innovation blossoming from partnerships among seemingly disparate groups all looking for similar outcomes, whether they concern peace, productivity or profit.

July 14, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Bechtel BNI are joining forces to a new class of cyberdefense professionals to protect the nation’s critical digital infrastructure. The Bechtel-Lawrence Livermore-Los Alamos Cyber Career Development Program is designed to allow the national labs to recruit and rapidly develop cybersecurity specialists who can guide research at their respective institutions and create solutions that meet the cyberdefense needs of private industry, which owns about 80 percent of the nation’s critical digital infrastructure and assets.

July 14, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) primary external advisory board today announced a report calling for the agency to increase its staff of cryptography experts and to implement more explicit processes for ensuring openness and transparency to strengthen its cryptography efforts. In making its recommendations, the Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology (VCAT) specifically addressed NIST’s interactions with the National Security Agency (NSA).

July 14, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The National Security Agency (NSA) has selected five more schools for the National Centers of Academic Excellence (CAE) in Cyber Operations Program, which is designed to cultivate more U.S. cyber professionals. These schools are now designated as Cyber Operations CAEs for the 2014-2019 academic years:

July 10, 2014
By Maryann Lawlor

Research on the state of cybersecurity of the U.S. critical infrastructure companies reveals that 67 percent have experienced at least one security compromise that led to the loss of confidential information or disruption to operations during the past year. In addition, 24 percent of a survey’s respondents said the compromises involved insider attacks or negligent privileged information technology users. Only 6 percent provide cybersecurity training for all employees.

July 8, 2014

Maj. Gen. James K. McLaughlin, USAF, has been nominated for appointment to the rank of lieutenant general and for assignment as deputy commander, U.S. Cyber Command, at Fort Meade, Maryland. McLaughlin is currently serving as commander, 24th Air Force, Air Force Space Command; and commander, Air Forces Cyber, U.S. Cyber Command, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, according to a Defense Department press release.

June 25, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

U.S. Defense Department networks will need to operate with the minimum security available as connectivity and the threat picture evolve, said a top defense official. Terry Halvorsen, acting Defense Department chief information officer, minced no words as he described how tight budgets are limiting options across the board.

“I want for all these networks, the minimum level of security to get the mission done,” Halvorsen declared. “If we try to do the best security everywhere, we will not get to what we want. We don’t have the money; we don’t have the time.”

May 20, 2014
By George I. Seffers

People with access to privileged data—such as health care records, sensitive company information, intellectual property or personal records—frequently put their organization’s sensitive information at risk, according to a new report by Raytheon Company. The survey report, “Privileged User Abuse & The Insider Threat,” finds that many individuals often are granted access to data and areas of the network not necessary for their roles and responsibilities. Furthermore, 65 percent of survey respondents indicated that curiosity—not job necessity—drives them to access sensitive or confidential data.

Key findings include:

May 14, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

A key tenet of the Joint Information Environment (JIE) will be the ability of users to have access to the same information system capabilities regardless of physical location, according to Defense Information System Agency (DISA) officials. Speaking on the final day of AFCEA’s three-day JIE Mission Partner Symposium being held in Baltimore May 12-14, the panel of officials described the importance of mobile capability as well as connectivity.

May 14, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Joint Information Environment (JIE) seeks to network the entire defense community, but its ability to address customer requirements could run afoul of its original purpose. Many military users have specific needs that must be addressed, so the JIE must meet those requirements without jeopardizing its desired interoperability.

May 14, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Joint Information Environment (JIE) will be relying on virtual capabilities to a greater degree as part of several thrusts within the network. Enabling technologies include the cloud and software modernization as planners strive to ensure interoperability and access wherever users may be located.

May 13, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Transportation Command (TRANSCOM) moves more information than it does any physical commodity, and this development has redefined the command’s security requirements. These requirements are complicated by the presence of commercial providers whose presence poses potential cyberspace vulnerabilities.

May 13, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) is charging full speed into an infocentric environment that will include mobile technologies, changing the way the agency operates. Part of this effort includes the agency’s own version of the Joint Information Environment (JIE), which will help improve interoperability.

Kathy Cutler, director of information operations (J-6) and chief information officer at the DLA, explained these activities at a panel discussion on the second day of AFCEA’s three-day JIE Mission Partner Symposium being held in Baltimore May 12-14. This process began 10 years ago and is moving into a new phase with an increased emphasis on mobile technologies.

May 13, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) is taking an unconventional approach to equipping its forces for an information environment that does not follow conventional guidelines. The command must provide networking for a theater force that can range from one person up through thousands of people, and it faces diverse mission needs that can require large communications pipes.

May 13, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The battle against cybermarauders begins with individual home computers, according to a high-ranking official with the U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM). Rear Adm. Hank Bond, USN, J-6, NORTHCOM, and deputy J-3 for cyberspace operations at NORAD, discussed national cybersecurity in a panel presentation on the second day of AFCEA's three-day Joint Information Environment (JIE) Mission Partner Symposium being held in Baltimore May 12-14.

“Where does homeland security end and homeland defense begin?” he asked. “The contested environment is in the dot com; it's in your computer at home.”

May 13, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

Fresh off supporting two overseas wars, the National Guard is planning for a larger role in military activities on the home front. Cyber is one area where the Guard may be serving a key role, officials say.

Some of these points were outlined in a panel discussion on the second day of AFCEA’s three-day Joint Information Environment (JIE) Mission Partner Symposium being held in Baltimore May 12-14. Rear Adm. Hank Bond, USN, J-6, U.S. Northern Command, and deputy J-3 for cyberspace operations at NORAD, said, “Our way forward in cyberspace is to properly develop the force structure around the Guard. The commercial space is the contested space.”

May 12, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The defense community must move away from email and fully into social media, says the director of the Defense Information System Agency (DISA). Lt. Gen. Ronnie D. Hawkins Jr., USAF, told the audience at AFCEA’s Joint Information Environment Mission Partner Symposium in Baltimore that the defense community must break with the past in digital information technology.

“The wave of the future is in collaboration and social networking, and we have to get there,” Gen. Hawkins declared. “The people who are coming into DOD [the Defense Department] don’t do email. We have to get off of it.”

May 12, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is changing its own internal methods of operation to reflect the direction it is giving the services in the move toward the Joint Information Environment, said its director. Lt. Gen. Ronnie D. Hawkins Jr., USAF, DISA director, told the audience at AFCEA’s three-day Joint Information Environment Mission Partner Symposium in Baltimore that the agency recognizes the need to follow its own direction.

“We ought to be able to eat our own dog food,” Gen. Hawkins declared. “We must do what we are telling the services to do.”

May 12, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The architecture of the Joint Information Environment (JIE) will help the Defense Department deal with the growing insider threat, according to the head of the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA). Lt. Gen. Ronnie D. Hawkins Jr., USAF, DISA director, told the audience at AFCEA’s three-day Joint Information Environment Mission Partner Symposium in Baltimore that the move to the cloud will enable better security and prevent the traditional insider threat from menacing valuable data.

April 23, 2014
By Matthew Smith

Whether a well-established company or one just getting started with cybersecurity risk management programs, those in the industry often can use a little help navigating the cumbersome and technical systems. This snapshot features pointers to clarify existing guidance and help organizations manage cybersecurity risk.

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