Cyber

Hackers, take your mark.

Building on the successes of the U.S. Defense Department’s “Hack the Pentagon” bug bounty program launched earlier this year, it’s now the Army’s turn.

Hackers now can register for the “Hack the Army” bug bounty challenge, a competition modeled after the Defense Digital Service’s “Hack the Pentagon” pilot. The Army program is focused on more operationally relevant websites—specifically those affecting the service’s recruiting mission, according to a news release.

November 17, 2016
By George I. Seffers
Terry Halvorsen, U.S. Defense Department chief information officer, addresses the crowd at AFCEA TechNet Asia-Pacific. Photo by Bob Goodwin

Terry Halvorsen, U.S. Defense Department chief information officer, told the AFCEA TechNet Asia-Pacific audience he is concerned about the cyber threat posed by insiders, but also warned against limiting employees’ sense of freedom.

November 17, 2016
By George I. Seffers
Experts debate whether a cyber attack against common information systems or industrial control systems would be more lethal. Photo by Bob Goodwin

U.S. military and civilian experts on protecting critical infrastructure control systems debated whether a cyber attack on common information systems or on industrial control systems would be more deadly in response to an audience question at the AFCEA TechNet Asia-Pacific conference in Honolulu.

November 15, 2016
By George I. Seffers
Panelists at TechNet Asia-Paciifc 2016 discuss the need for trust in the cyber domain. Photo by Bob Goodwin

Trust—or a lack thereof—is one of the biggest impediments to information sharing among coalitions and partner nations, according to a panel of experts speaking at the AFCEA TechNet Asia-Pacific conference in Honolulu.

October 27, 2016
By Sandra Jontz

As the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s annual cyber safety awareness campaign winds down, if you’re tired of hearing about online threats and ways to patch vulnerabilities, you’re not alone.

November 2, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Maj. Gen. Earl Matthews, USAF, (Ret.), former director of cyberspace operations and chief information security officer for the Air Force, delivers the luncheon keynote during MILCOM 2016. Photo by Mike Carpenter

The military that can control and deny access to and use of the electromagnetic spectrum will be the victors of the next war, predicts Maj. Gen. Earl Matthews, USAF, (Ret.), former director of cyberspace operations and chief information security officer for the Air Force. 

Attaining supremacy within that crucial domain should be driving emerging technologies that will give the U.S. military the technical overmatch on the battlefield, said Matthews, speaking Wednesday at MILCOM 2016, a three-day international conference for military communications.  

October 28, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Better cybersecurity begins with everyone getting better at assessing risk, said Bob Kolasky (c), deputy assistant secretary for infrastructure protection at the Department of Homeland Security.

Efforts to increasingly digitize networks that run the nation’s critical infrastructure enterprises also are boosting attack surfaces and vulnerabilities in an enduring cybersecurity contest in which hackers target those weaknesses with an elevated furor, experts admonished during a panel discussion on the issue.

November 1, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Lt. Gen. Alan Lynn, USA, director of DISA and JFHQ-DODIN, addresses cyber-based network issues at MILCOM 2016 in Baltimore. Photo by Mike Carpenter

The future of warfighting is smaller and lighter—technology that will let troops conduct battles from a smartphone or tablet, said Lt. Gen. Alan Lynn, USA, director of the Defense Information Systems Agency, or DISA.

November 1, 2016
By Capt. Ryan Robinson, USA

The burgeoning cyber domain as a battlefront has done more than shift the front lines for warfighters—it has virtually erased them. At the same time, traditional armies continue to threaten U.S. national security both at home and abroad. Given the scope of cyber and conventional warfare, how does the U.S. military balance its competing needs? 

October 26, 2016
By Julianne Simpson
Privacy and security settings exist for a reason. Learn about and use the privacy and security settings on social networks.

According to a recent report by cybersecurity developer Forcepoint, millennials might pose as serious a cybersecurity risk to enterprise networks as cyber criminals. The research found that the baby boomer generation, those aged 51 to 69, are more cautious online while the younger work force is more likely to abandon caution in exchange for digital convenience.

October 25, 2016
By Sandra Jontz

Millennials might pose as grave a cybersecurity risk to enterprise networks as cyber criminals, according to one recent study. With more of them entering the federal workplace, they bring along technology preferences and bad behavior that threaten security of federal IT systems, according to cybersecurity developer Forcepoint.

October 19, 2016
By Julianne Simpson

National Cyber Security Awareness Month is designed to engage and educate public and private sector partners through events and initiatives to raise awareness about cybersecurity; provide them with tools and resources needed to stay safe online; and increase the resiliency of the nation in the event of a cyber incident. This week’s theme is “Recognizing and Combating Cybercrime.”

October 21, 2016

Major websites such as Twitter, Spotify, Amazon—and AFCEA International and SIGNAL Media—fell victim to successive massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks on Friday. The Internet traffic firm Dyn informed people of the cyber attack after the sites were shut down.

"We have begun monitoring and mitigating a DDoS attack against our Dyn Managed (Domain Name System) infrastructure,” the company said in a statement. “Our engineers are continuing to work on mitigating this issue.” Service was restored late Friday morning. Some customers experienced increased DNS query latency and delayed zone propagation. 

October 18, 2016

NATO Allied Command Transformation and the NATO Communications and Information (NCI) Agency launched yesterday an independent project to research options for streamlining NATO’s cyber capability development and acquisition processes. The final report from RAND Corporation is due in January.

October 17, 2016
By Aubrey Merchant-Dest

Last year, the Defense Department issued the Cybersecurity Culture and Compliance Initiative (DC3I), a memorandum containing alarming statistics on the actual number of successful network compromises and their causes, and principles for guiding daily operations for network users. The good news is that out of 30 million known malicious intrusions occurring over 10 months, 99.9 percent were prevented.

October 14, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

Last in a four-part series on election cyber vulnerabilities.

Standardizing voter registration processes, voting machines and vote tabulation is the key to eliminating most vulnerabilities plaguing U.S. elections, according to several cybersecurity experts. These standardizations would embed security, enable backups and eliminate many backdoors through which hackers and vote fraudsters currently can warp the results of an election.

October 14, 2016
By Sandra Jontz

Lt. Gen. Paul M. Nakasone, USA, assumed leadership of U.S. Army Cyber Command and 2nd Army during a ceremony Friday at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. He took over responsibilities from outgoing commander Lt. Gen. Edward C. Cardon, USA, who led Army Cyber for more than three years.

October 13, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

Third in a four-part series on election cyber vulnerabilities.

October 12, 2016
By Robert K. Ackerman

Second in a four-part series on election cyber vulnerabilities.

October 12, 2016
By Julianne Simpson

Being a victim of a cyber attack, either as an individual or business, can not only wreak havoc through major inconvenience and annoyance, but can also lead to financial ruin and can potentially threaten a victim’s reputation and safety.

Pages