Education

October 3, 2013
George I. Seffers

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., has been awarded a $6,765,425 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for developmental software. The purpose of this acquisition is to design, develop, test and demonstrate advanced net-centric, multi-intelligence exploitation and fusion capabilities capable of exploiting real-time operational signals intelligence and imagery intelligence to improve situational awareness and enable event recognition. The Air Force Research Laboratory, Rome N.Y., is the contracting activity (FA8750-13-C-0220).

October 3, 2013
George I. Seffers

Johns Hopkins University Applied Research Laboratory (JHU/APL) University Affiliated Research Center (UARC), Laurel, Md., is being awarded a $9,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to provide technologies for the interdiction of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosive material. This effort will support the nation’s weapons of mass destruction-related counterforce, consequence assessment, defeat, and arms control objectives.

July 22, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Utah State University Research Foundation, North Logan, Utah, was awarded a contract with a maximum value of $12 million for research and development services in support of the Precision Lightweight Weapon and Sensor Mount program. The Army Contracting Command, Fort Eustis, Va., is the contracting activity (W911W6-13-D-0005). 

July 18, 2013

The Office of Naval Research and the AUVSI Foundation are co-sponsoring an autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) competition, which supports interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education while increasing the pool of AUV ideas. The 16th International RoboSub Competition, titled “License to Dive,” will challenge university and high school student teams to bump buoys, park, fire foam torpedoes through a hexagonal cutout, deposit two markers into bins while submerged, and deliver two PVS mock pizza boxes to a specified location.

May 3, 2013
By Beverly Cooper

Budget sequestration has made obtaining government-mandated training more difficult—this despite government requirements that individuals earn continuing education units (CEUs) and certification maintenance units (CMUs)”to keep current in their professions. Many of the opportunities in the past were centered around large-scale, efficient training that could certify more people by bringing groups together. However, travel restrictions have complicated this centralized collaboration.

March 14, 2013

Old Dominion University (ODU) now offers a graduate-level procurement program that focuses on how to support cost savings, improve efficiencies and determine other strategic goals for public-sector organizations. The graduate certificate stand-alone program comprises 15 credits: four required courses and one elective. Students can take these courses online or at the university in Norfolk, Virginia.

February 5, 2013

The Federal Chief Information Officers (CIO) Council has launched the 2013 Information Technology (IT) Job Shadow Day program. For more than a decade, the program has enabled high school students from all across the country to shadow federal IT professionals in their communities for a day. Job shadow events will take place between now and May 1. Federal employees who would like to volunteer can register on the Office of Personnel Management’s MAX.gov website.

December 5, 2012

Sandia National Laboratories has created a hiring program that helps wounded warriors get into the work force and develop career-based skills and experience. Under the Wounded Warrior Working Group, Sandia hires qualified applicants for one to three years, which could lead to permanent employment. Executive, technical and veteran mentors are a key component of the program. Applicants can be separated from the service for any length of time. While a college degree is not required, Sandia expects those chosen to participate in the program to pursue higher education while working at the laboratories.

November 21 ,2012
By Maryann Lawlor

The (ISC)2 Foundation’s information security 2013 scholarship program application process will open on January 1, 2013, and it offers a total of $120,000 in awards to women, graduate students, young professionals and faculty. The foundation will award up to two scholarships totaling $40,000 to women pursuing an education in information security. In addition, it will give seed funding for up to eight grants of $3,000 each to assist graduate students conducting special research. One of the foundation’s other undergraduate scholarship winners will receive the Harold F.

November 14, 2014
By Sandra Jontz
Michelle Dennedy (r), chief privacy officer for Intel Security, talks about a new program to teach children safe cyberpractices in partnership with Discovery Education, led by Bill Goodwyn, (c). Penny Baldwin, CMO of Intel Security, moderated the discussion.

Intel Security (formerly McAfee) partnered with Discovery Education to launch a three-year national education initiative with a goal of reaching at least 35 million students with a new program to teach safe cyberpractices.

Think Before You Link” is the first and only Discovery Education-supported initiative to focus on cybersecurity education with a first of its kind digital safety curricula, Bill Goodwyn, president and CEO of Discovery Education, said during a kickoff luncheon this week.

August 27, 2014
By Sandra Jontz
U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis (R-IL) and U.S. Army veteran Garrett Anderson speak of the critical need for the Chez Family Foundation Center for Wounded Veterans in Higher Education – University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Garrett Anderson already is a statistic. He is a wounded combat veteran. He is an amputee. He suffers from traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. But for his two daughters’ sake more than his own, Anderson says he’s working to avoid being counted in the daunting statistic that plagues 9.2 percent of U.S. veterans: unemployment.

Despite feeling overwhelmed, Anderson went back to school and attends the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he is working toward a degree in social work.

August 20, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

College students of today are studying for jobs that have yet to be conceived—an insight into the rapidity at which fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics are transforming.

“The kids in school now, the jobs they’ll be doing in five years haven’t been invented yet,” says Erica Bertoli, Outreach coordinator at the Army’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) in Maryland.

September 1, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

Wounded veterans aspiring to receive a college education can earn diplomas from a wide selection of disciplines at a uniquely conceived center that will offer the aid of state-of-the-art assisted and adaptive devices tailored specifically to meet their needs, irrespective of their disabilities. The facility at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign employs a range of advanced technologies to enable an environment for severely wounded veterans, along with any needed caregivers, to pursue educational goals that otherwise might be viewed as inaccessible.

August 8, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Systems entered in the U.S. Navy’s 17th annual RoboSub competition, held July 28-Aug. 3, are far more sophisticated than the toys that competed in the first competition, which was launched in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

“In the earlier days when we first did this, the systems were considered to be some kind of toys,” says Steve Koepenick, an autonomous systems expert with the Navy’s Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, which hosts the competition. “They are now tools. They’re part of the kit that our sailors and Marines take into theater with them. That’s reflected in the competition and the things the students are trying to do.”

June 19, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

Here’s a little good news for students who not only are college-bound, but who want to or plan to study in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, according to a government watchdog report.

Both the number of degrees awarded, and the number of jobs in STEM fields, have increased over the past decade, according to a report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO), which studied STEM educational programs because of researchers' disagreement about whether there are enough STEM workers to meet employer demand.

June 1, 2014
By George I. Seffers
The Centers for Academic Excellence-Cyber Operations program is succeeding, NSA officials say, but enthusiasm at some schools has been dampened as a result of documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

The first graduates are emerging from centers of excellence for cyber operations that teach the in-depth computer science and engineering skills necessary to conduct network operations. The program better prepares graduates to defend networks and should reduce the on-the-job training needed for new hires, saving both time and money.

May 1, 2014
By George I. Seffers
Researchers working on the RoboEarth project demonstrate a robot’s ability to learn and cooperate with other robotic systems to serve medical patients. The project uses cloud computing to teach robots to perform tasks that seem intuitive for humans but are a challenge for robots.

Researchers working on multiple projects in Europe and the United States are using cloud computing to teach robotic systems to perform a multitude of tasks ranging from household chores to serving hospital patients and flipping pancakes. The research, which one day could be applied to robotic systems used for national defense, homeland security or medical uses, lowers costs while allowing robots to learn more quickly, share information and better cooperate with one another.

December 1, 2013
By Henry S. Kenyon
A Georgia Tech research team has developed a microchip that records and stores pressure and motion as memory. This piezoelectrically modulated resistive memory (PRM) system opens the way for new types of touch-screen interfaces, robotics control systems and prosthetics systems such as artificial skin.

Physical movement stored as memory in a microchip could lead to advances in touch screens, robot control devices and medical implants. Researchers are arraying nanowires on a microchip to form a write-read memory cell as part of ongoing work that could convert motions, such as a hand in a glove or pressing a display, into memory. Moving or putting pressure on the nanowires creates an electrical current that can be read and recorded as memory. Arrays of such cells offer the potential for a variety of user interface applications and for new ways to convert mechanical or biological actions into electronic data.

September 6, 2013
George I. Seffers

Officials at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, are developing a program that allows students from any academic discipline to work closely with the U.S. intelligence community in a variety of actual national security-related problems. The university is on track to begin offering a minor in intelligence analysis in the relatively near future and a major in the next five years.

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