Event Coverage

September 11, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Senior military leaders will try next week to hash out differences on the command and control (C2) of the Joint Information Enterprise, or JIE, said Lt. Gen. Mark Bowman, USA, director, command, control, communications and computers/cyber and chief information officer, Joint Chiefs of Staff. Gen. Bowman made the remarks while addressing the audience at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014 conference, Augusta, Georgia.

September 10, 2014
George I. Seffers

In his farewell address, President Dwight Eisenhower coined the phrase "military industrial complex" to describe the relationships between the military, Congress and industry. That complex no longer exists, according to Tom Davis, a former vice president for General Dynamics. Davis made the comments during an industry panel at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014 conference in Augusta, Georgia.

September 9, 2014
By George I. Seffers

U.S. Army officials struggled during AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014 in Augusta, Georgia, to discuss the future of cyber operations when much of that future is currently unknowable, in large part because no one knows the full effects or challenges of emerging technologies.

September 10, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The cyber era requires partnerships and information sharing across the agencies, industries and nations, said Maj. Gen. Stephen Fogarty, USA, the new commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence, Fort Gordon, during a keynote address at the AFCEA TechNet 2014 Augusta conference, Augusta, Georgia.

September 10, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden single-handedly shocked the U.S. intelligence community by leaking reams of information to the news media, but the insider threat is much more widespread, said Maj. Gen. Stephen Fogarty, USA, the new commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Gordon, Georgia.

“Who would imagine one person could have as much impact on this nation as he did,” Gen. Fogarty said, referring to Snowden. “And we were not prepared for that. We were not looking for that. That’s an asymmetric attack that occurred, and it’s happening every single day.”

September 10, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. Army is building a Cyber Center of Excellence at Fort Gordon, Georgia, and it will not come cheap, warned Maj. Gen. Stephen Fogarty, USA, the center’s new commanding general.

September 9, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. Army is standing up a cyber brigade and considering a cyber branch, which has some questioning the future of the service's Signal Corps, but the Signal Corps will survive, Lt. Gen. Robert Ferrell, USA, the service’s chief information officer, said during a luncheon keynote speech at the AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014 conference, Augusta, Georgia. “The Signal Corps will be enduring. It will not be going away,” Gen. Ferrell said. “You’re still going to be required to build, operate and defend the network.

September 9, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. Army may at some point need to allow soldiers to conduct offensive cyberwarfare at the brigade combat team level, according to a panel of chief warrant officers speaking at AFCEA TechNet Augusta 2014, Augusta, Georgia.

September 9, 2014
George I. Seffers

All too often, the topic of cyber presents a negative view of vulnerabilities and attacks, but cyber has a positive role to play in national defense, said Lt. Gen. Edward Cardon, USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command.

September 9, 2014
George I. Seffers

Sometimes, cyber warriors will have to pick and choose what to protect, because, “It’s increasingly clear we can’t protect everything,” said Lt. Gen. Edward Cardon, USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command, while addressing the AFCEA TechNet Augusta audience in Augusta, Georgia.

September 9, 2014
George I. Seffers

U.S. Army officials are laboring to define what the force will look like in 2025. But technologically speaking, it is hard to define anything beyond the next two or three years, said Lt. Gen. Edward Cardon, USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command, during AFCEA TechNet Augusta held Sept. 9-11, Augusta, Georgia.

August 6, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

Major changes in defense acquisition no longer are desirable—they are essential if the United States is to maintain an effective military in a time of increasing threats and decreasing resources. Already the United States is trailing several allies technologically, and potential adversaries are hard at work developing technologies that threaten U.S. force superiority. Patterns of technology development have changed, but sclerotic acquisition practices work counter to efforts to reap the benefits of innovation.

August 5, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

More specific requirements and better incentives could produce better products at reduced costs, said a leading U.S. Defense Department official. Frank Kendall III, undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics, told the keynote audience at AFCEA’s Defense Acquisition Modernization Symposium 2014 that adjusting the contracting process could produce at least some desired results in acquisition.

August 5, 2014

The AFCEA Defense Acquisition Modernization Symposium held August 5-6 in Washington, D.C., covers "Better Buying Power: Do We Have It Right?"

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July 31, 2014

The inaugural Defense Acquisition Modernization Symposium, hosted by AFCEA International, highlights “Better Buying Power” as it applies to government, industry and academia. The event boasts leaders from the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition along with industry leaders to provide attendees with myriad solutions, updates and exchanges.

June 25, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The growing call for an independent U.S. cyber service along the lines of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps is not likely to gain followers among policy makers, say a number of service cyber officers. The growing importance of cyber as a warfighting domain has spurred suggestions that the discipline might follow in the footsteps of the U.S. Air Force, which became an independent service shortly after World War II. However, panelists on the second day of the AFCEA International Cyber Symposium June 24-25 in Baltimore dashed that concept.

June 25, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

U.S. Defense Department data will be invading the commercial world as the department moves its unclassified information out of its own hands. Terry Halvorsen, acting Defense Department chief information officer, described the upcoming move at the Wednesday luncheon of the AFCEA International Cyber Symposium, being held June 24-25 in Baltimore.

June 25, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The acting chief information officer (CIO) for the U.S. Defense Department is promoting a diversity movement for information technology. He wants to see a younger work force that includes people who have come of age in the digital era.

Terry Halvorsen, acting department CIO, told the Wednesday luncheon audience at the AFCEA International Cyber Symposium, being held June 24-25 in Baltimore, that the department is striving to recruit the right skill sets it needs for information technology. But, having skill sets alone is not enough.

“We need to attract a younger work force,” he said. “We’re filling jobs, but we’re not getting the right mix. Diversity is needed.”

June 25, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

Estonia has established a dedicated cyberdefense infrastructure and implemented new policies that are serving as models for other allied nations gearing up for potential cyber attacks. The Estonian measures come in the wake of the Baltic nation undergoing a severe cyber attack in 2007, which ultimately led to Estonia hosting the NATO Cooperative Cyber Defense Center of Excellence.

June 25, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

U.S. Defense Department networks will need to operate with the minimum security available as connectivity and the threat picture evolve, said a top defense official. Terry Halvorsen, acting Defense Department chief information officer, minced no words as he described how tight budgets are limiting options across the board.

“I want for all these networks, the minimum level of security to get the mission done,” Halvorsen declared. “If we try to do the best security everywhere, we will not get to what we want. We don’t have the money; we don’t have the time.”

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