Intelligence

August 15, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
Lt. Gen. Robert P. Ashley Jr., USA, Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) director, describes how the agency’s new Machine-assisted Analytic Rapid-repository System, or MARS, will change the way intelligence data is processed and accessed.

The new global threat picture has signaled the time for defense intelligence to come together in an unprecedented common operating picture. With the broader availability of new technology and the need to conduct globally integrated operations at scale and speed, U.S. forces must move away from stovepipe systems and operate more as an enterprise, posits Lt. Gen. Robert P. Ashley Jr., USA, Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) director. “For us to be able to operate really as an enterprise, to be able to move information from the intelligence community level down to warfighters … and to be able to ingest that at the services, we must be much more interoperable than we’ve been in the past.”

August 13, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
Credit: Segey Cherviakov/Shutterstock

At the top of the list of the tools that the U.S. intelligence community is expecting to help accomplish its future mission is artificial intelligence, or AI. It is being counted on to help the collection and sorting of the large amounts of data that are growing exponentially. However, like many of these tools, AI can be co-opted or adopted by adversaries well-schooled in basic scientific disciplines. As a result, AI can be a trap for unwitting intelligence officials, offers Bob Gourley, co-founder and chief technology officer of OODA LLC.

July 24, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
The National Security Agency (NSA) has created a new Cybersecurity Directorate to improve cyber partnerships and increase intelligence coordination.

The National Security Agency (NSA) is launching its new Cybersecurity Directorate with a promise of “opening the door to partners and customers on a wide variety of cybersecurity efforts,” according to an agency statement. These partners will include established government allies in the cyber domain such as the U.S. Cyber Command, the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI. The directorate also is promising to share information better with its customers to help them defend against malicious cyber activity.

July 3, 2019
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Thousands of British and French troops wait on the dunes of Dunkirk Beach, France, for transport to England during World War II, between May 26 and June 4, 1940. The Central Intelligence Agency cites the military evacuation of Dunkirk as the time its predecessor agency started depending on the private sector for key strategic intelligence. Credit: Shutterstock/Everett Historical

Charged with providing national security information to the nation, the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, or CIA, has had a long history of partnering with the industry to solve challenges. That need has not diminished, said Randy Burkett, staff historian from the CIA’s Center for the Study of Intelligence. 

Burkett, speaking at a recent Foundation for Innovation and Discovery (FINND) event, walked attendees through a few of the agency’s historically interesting challenges in which the industry came to its aid, beginning at the start of World War II. 

July 2, 2019
By Robert K. Ackerman
The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) has selected 10 innovative projects to help the agency measure the Earth’s magnetic field as part of its MagQuest competition. Credit: Shutterstock/Andrey VP

Magnetometer locations ranging from on the bottom of the sea to orbiting in space constitute the first round winners of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency's (NGA's) MagQuest open innovation challenge. Designed to generate novel ways of measuring Earth’s magnetic field, MagQuest is offering prizes totaling $1.2 million for novel geomagnetic data collection methodologies.

June 5, 2019
By Maryann Lawlor
U.S. Navy sailors collaborate with Naval Information Warfare Center Pacific’s RESTORE Lab to explore how three-dimensional scanning and printing can deliver an effective and reliable solution to repair critical warfighting equipment. U.S. Navy photo by Cmdr. John P Fagan /Released

The U.S. Navy is working to keep pace with its land counterparts by providing the right information, software updates and new technical capabilities to its sailors at the right place and the right time. In the case of the sea service, the right place is often out at sea and under suboptimal conditions for satellite transmissions. The right time is every moment they need it.

May 24, 2019
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats discusses national security issues with other leaders during a visit to The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. The intelligence community is seeking advancing capabilities to help strengthen national security. Credit: Office of the Director of National Intelligence

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence issued a special notice on May 22 seeking input from companies on advancing technologies such as artificial intelligence, data management and advanced computing to aid the intelligence community and strengthen national security. The request for information ask interested parties to respond by July 26.

The agency, or ODNI, is broadening the range of its Intelligence, Science, and Technology Partnership, known as In-STeP, to provide input on innovative capabilities that address ODNI's Intelligence Community (IC)-wide Strategic Initiatives.

ODNI’s IC-wide Strategic Initiatives include:

May 7, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
The FBI’s Cyber Division is strengthening its investigative capabilities to battle more and more digital-based crimes from global adversaries, says Amy Hess, executive assistant director of the FBI’s Criminal, Cyber, Response, and Services Branch. Credit: Atlantic Council/Image Link

The FBI has a full plate: fighting public corruption, organized and white-collar crime and domestic and foreign terrorism; solving violent crimes; protecting civil rights; neutralizing national security threats, espionage and counterintelligence; and mitigating threats of weapons of mass destruction, among other responsibilities. And one part of the bureau is growing to protect the nation against cyber threats.

April 8, 2019
By Maryann Lawlor
The Ghidra tool suite examines compiled code using disassembly, decompilation and graphing.

The National Security Agency is now sharing the source code of Ghidra, its reverse engineering tool developed by the agency’s Research Directorate in support of its cybersecurity mission. Ghidra, a suite of software analysis tools, examines complied code using capabilities such as disassembly, assembly, decompilation, graphing and scripting.

Ghidra helps analyze malicious code and malware and improves cybersecurity professionals’ understanding of potential vulnerabilities in their networks and systems. With this release, developers can now collaborate, create patches and extend the tool to fit their cybersecurity needs.

March 21, 2019
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency has launched MagQuest, a $1.2 million global open innovation challenge, seeking advanced approaches to geomagnetic data collection. Credit: Shutterstock/Siberian Art

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, headquartered in Springfield, Virginia, today announced the launch of MagQuest, its $1.2 million global open innovation challenge, seeking advanced approaches to geomagnetic data collection.

March 6, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
The U.S. Marshals Service, the nation’s first federal law enforcement agency, works to protect the judicial process, apprehend fugitives and transport federal prisoners, and needs advanced digital technologies that can keep up, says CIO Karl Mathias. Credit: AFCEA NOVA

As the chief information officer and an assistant director of the U.S. Marshals Service, Karl Mathias spends 75 percent to 80 percent of his time on the day-to-day information technology needs of the agency. In order to focus on developing new technologies, he would rather decrease that time, by leveraging advanced technologies that can help “keep the lights on, so to speak, the circuits alive, and the laptops running, patched and secure.”

March 5, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Intelligence community (IC) leaders, led by Dan Coats, director of National Intelligence, testify before the U.S. Senate as to the growing threats the country is facing from non-state and state actors. The IC’s CIO, John Sherman, is calling for urgency in developing U.S. capabilities, so the country will not be surpassed by adversaries' use of cyber, artificial intelligence and other technologies. Credit: ODNI

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence’s John Sherman, chief information officer (CIO) of the intelligence community, is alarmed about the shifting geopolitical forces around the world.

In his position since September 2017, Sherman is leading the flagship integration of the Intelligence Community Information Technology Enterprise, known as IC ITE (and pronounced like eyesight), which has been a six-year effort to modernize the information technology (IT) for the 17 member agencies of the intelligence community (IC).

January 31, 2019
By Kimberly Underwood
Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, pictured at a recent White House briefing, is calling for the intelligence community to "do things differently,” given the severe threats and complex adversarial environment the United States is facing.  Photo courtesy of ODNI

A new strategy for U.S. intelligence looks to improve integration of counterintelligence and security efforts, increasingly address cyber threats, and have clear guidance of civil liberties, privacy and transparency. As outlined in the U.S. National Intelligence Strategy (NIS), from Director of National Intelligence (DNI) Dan Coats, the intelligence community is facing a turbulent and complex strategic environment, and as such, the community “must do things differently.”

January 29, 2019
By George I. Seffers
Dan Coats, director of national intelligence, released today the intelligence community’s annual threat assessment, which lists cyber, artificial intelligence and weapons of mass destruction as some of the top technological threats. Credit: geralt/Pixabay

The United States faces a “toxic mix of threats,” Dan Coats, the director of National Intelligence, testified today before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence while unveiling the annual Worldwide Threat Assessment of the U.S. Intelligence Community.

January 9, 2019
Posted by George I. Seffers
IARPA announced today two new technology challenges related to credibility assessment and automated video surveillance. Credit: TheDigitalArtist/Pixabay

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) has announced two new challenges: the Credibility Assessment Standardized Evaluation (CASE) Challenge, which seeks methods for measuring the performance of credibility assessment techniques and technologies, and the Activities in Extended Video (ActEV) Prize Challenge, which aims to develop algorithms that will monitor surveillance videos for suspicious activity.

January 9, 2019
Posted by George I. Seffers
IARPA has issued two requests for information, one for classified deep learning and machine learning research and another for novel cooling solutions for portable devices. Credit: geralt/Pixabay

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) is seeking information on research efforts in the area of machine learning with a particular focus on deep learning and in the area of cooling systems for small mobile devices.

November 1, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Metadata from communication signals can provide a nonencrypted source of signals intelligence, says David Stupples, professor, School of Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, City, University of London.  Shutterstock/Sutham

Data from mobile device signals such as GSM may be an untapped resource for signals intelligence on the battlefield. Although the payload of a communication system is encoded, information about the nature of the communication that is included in the GSM signal is not and should not be overlooked. This information, known as metadata, could prove to be an important tool for warfighters, experts say.

September 5, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
Panelists discussing the effect of influence operations on the United States are (l-r) panel moderator Shane Harris of The Washington Post; Ronald Waltzman, The Rand Corporation; Joe Morosco, ODNI; and Fran Moore, Financial Systemic Analysis and Resilience Center. Photography by Herman Farrer

Foreign influence operations against the United States and its allies are likely to proliferate as more nations with propaganda agendas learn how to exploit social media technologies, say intelligence community experts. Russia’s attempts to interfere with the 2016 U.S. presidential election are only the tip of the iceberg, and government must learn how to work with industry to counter these efforts.

September 19, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
Jim Cannaliato of Engineering Solutions Inc. (l) receives a $3,000 check for his company’s winning entry in the EPIC App challenge. Presenting the check is AFCEA Intelligence Committee member Joe Schmank of Microsoft Azure Government Cloud.

A challenge to develop an intelligence app concluded with software that uses neural networks to predict social unrest around the world. Sponsored by the AFCEA Emerging Professionals in Intelligence Committee (EPIC) and the Cyber Council of the Intelligence and National Security Alliance, the challenge awarded a total of $6,000 to three firms tasked with developing a software solution to a problem currently confronted by the intelligence community.

September 5, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
A row of service intelligence chiefs describes today's threats and needed solutions in a panel chaired by (far l) Vice Adm. Jake Jacoby, USN (Ret.). The panelists are (l-r) Vice Adm. Matthew Kohler, USN; Brig. Gen. Dmitri Henry, USMC; Rear Adm. Robert Hayes, USCG;Lt. Gen. VeraLinn “Dash” Jamieson, USAF; and Lt. Gen. Scott Berrier, USA. Photography by Herman Farrer

A resurgent Russian military that has adopted an entirely different posture than its communist predecessor is posing a major military challenge to U.S. forces worldwide, according to U.S. service intelligence chiefs. Where China is boosting its military to realize its goal of global economic supremacy, Russia is focusing its force modernization to defeat the U.S. military in any setting, the flag officers said.

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