big data

May 24, 2018
By Maryann Lawlor
When considering data migration to the cloud, organizations must first understand their workload and application portfolio. credit: Shutterstock

Federal mandates and economic concerns are pushing businesses and government agencies to migrate their IT services to the cloud. As a result, decision makers must consider how to proceed in a way that meets compliance requirements in a timely, affordable and secure fashion.

Two data migration experts at experienced commercial organizations recently offered their advice to organizations that are just beginning on the data migration trail or are well on their way but hitting a few bumps in the road.

May 9, 2018
 

ECS Federal LLC, Fairfax, Virginia, was awarded a $48,000,608 modification to provide analysis of large structured and unstructured data sets in order to provide insight to the warfighter on the tactical edge using modern computational and algorithmic techniques through creation of a prototype environment with prototype technologies to uncover key insights with large data sets using robust ontologies created through data science partnership with the Department of Defense research laboratories and universities. Work will be performed in Fairfax, Virginia, with an estimated completion date of March 28, 2019. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $14,000,000 were obligated at the time of the award.

April 20, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
The Marine Corps is looking for advanced information technology solutions when it comes to data management, cloud, artificial intelligence and machine learning, Col. Stinson told the industry at the recent AFCEA International Potomac Quantico Chapter event.

With an onslaught of new technologies ever present on the horizon, the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) is working to make sense of what technologies will work for them, not only in the traditional warfighting domains, but also in cyber—the new domain. Right now, they have a long list of priorities associated with modernizing the network, meeting standards and mandates, and fielding new capabilities.

March 16, 2018
 

ECS Federal LLC, Fairfax, Virginia, was awarded a $9,529,017 modification to provide analysis of large structured and unstructured data sets. The company will assist the Army in providing insight to the warfigher on the tactical edge using modern computational and algorithmic techniques through creation of a prototype environment with prototype technologies, DOD said. The goal is to uncover key insights with large data sets using robust ontologies created through data science partnership with DOD research laboratories and universities. Work will be performed in Fairfax, Virginia, with an estimated completion date of September 28, 2019.

February 28, 2018
 

In a $350 million deal, San Francisco, California-based Splunk Inc. will purchase Phantom Cyber Corporation, a Palo Alto, California-based cyber security firm specializing in security orchestration, automation and response, known as SOAR. Splunk will acquire Phantom using a combination of cash and stock. The transaction is expected to close during the first half of 2018, subject to customary closing conditions and regulatory reviews. Oliver Friedrichs, Founder and CEO, Phantom will report to Haiyan Song, senior vice president and general manager of security markets, Splunk.

March 1, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Credit: Shutterstock/Bruce Rolff

Part of the Office of Naval Research’s efforts in command, control, communications and computers is to provide key analytical tools to planners, analysts and commanders swamped by data. To that end, the office, known as the ONR, is conducting basic and applied research in applications that will cut maneuver planning time, expand access to data, enhance analytical processing and improve predictions. The tools are meant to improve decision making across antisubmarine warfare, integrated air and missile defense, electromagnetic maneuver warfare, and expeditionary and integrated fires missions.

December 22, 2017
By Kimberly Underwood
Veterans, active duty military and civilians welcome wounded warriors from all over the country to Huntsville International Airport in Alabama in commemoration of Veterans Week in November. Big data corporation Splunk is partnering with nonprofit veterans’ organizations to make a difference in getting veterans back to work. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Teddy Wade.

In 2016, big data software company Splunk promised to donate a minimum of $100 million in software licenses, training, support and education to nonprofit organizations and educational institutions over the next 10 years. The company’s Splunk4Good initiative supports nonprofit organizations, academic research and social improvements.

September 7, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Panelists discuss section 702 Intelligence reauthorization during the Intelligence and National Security Summit.

Officials from across the U.S. intelligence community are calling for reauthorization of section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which allows the government to collect data on non-U.S. citizens on foreign soil, as Congress debates whether to reauthorize, reform or outright reject it.

Multiple officials from multiple agencies touted the benefits of Section 702 during the 2017 Intelligence and National Security Summit, which was held Sept. 6-7 in Washington, D.C.

June 28, 2017
By Maryann Lawlor
DIA Director Lt. Gen Vincent Stewart, USMC, who was recently tapped to become U.S. Cyber Command’s deputy commander, says analyzing and distributing the growing amount of data the intelligence community collects is a constant challenge.

Senior intelligence officials identified the increasing amount of data and how to handle it as the one of the largest challenges the intelligence community faces today. “We are collecting more data than we can effectively process,” said Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) Director Lt. Gen Vincent Stewart, USMC. “What we process, we struggle to make sense of, and what we understand, we can’t effectively disseminate across a global enterprise to ensure it helps drive critical decision making.”

June 29, 2017
By George I. Seffers
U.S. Army officials assessing cutting-edge cyber and electronic warfare capabilities during Cyber Quest 2017 tout the ingenuity of soldiers participating in the exercise.

U.S. Army officials expect that by this fall, they will have formal approval of a rapid prototyping process for acquiring cyber and electronic warfare prototypes assessed during the just-completed Cyber Quest 2017 exercise at Fort Gordon, Georgia.

Army officials describe Cyber Quest as an annual cyber and electronic warfare exploration and collaboration event hosted by the Cyber Center of Excellence. This is the second year for the event.

May 2, 2017
 

The U.S. Defense Department has initiated a market research effort to identify potential industry sources under a potential five-year, $325 million acquisition program for technical support services. The market research effort could potentially lead to a contract award this fiscal year.

April 28, 2017
 

Forecasting data collected during the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity's (IARPA’s) Aggregative Contingent Estimation (ACE) program by team Good Judgment is now available for use by the public and the research community via

April 20, 2017
 

Organizations today must deal with an avalanche of big data and the advanced computing requirements that are driven by so much data. To cover the accelerated speeds and throughput needs they increasingly face, their information systems require increased network speeds and upgrades as well as improved security and monitoring tools.

April 17, 2017
By Sandra Jontz

The cannonade of small satellites hovering above the Earth is creating a dilemma for government and industry alike: how to process enormous amounts of data sent to the ground. 

Collecting information isn’t the hard part, nor is transmitting it, experts say. What vexes intelligence analysts the most is not being able to make heads or tails of petabyte upon petabyte of data. But the government seeks help from the commercial world to make that happen.

February 13, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Sandia scientists Marlene and George Bachand show off their new method for encrypting and storing sensitive information in DNA. Digital data storage degrades and can become obsolete, and old-school books and paper require lots of space. (Photo by Lonnie Anderson)

Behind the Science is an occasional series of blogs focusing on the people advancing science and technology.

George and Marlene Bachand, a married couple working at Sandia National Laboratories, have partnered on more science projects than they can recall.

February 1, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Researchers have developed a technique for encoding text within synthetic DNA that they say would take an infinite number of random, brute-force attacks to break.

Scientists at Sandia National Laboratories are searching for partners to apply technology for encrypting text within synthetic DNA. The encryption is far stronger than conventional technology and practically impossible to break, researchers say.

In September, the Sandia team wrapped up a three-year effort titled Synthetic DNA for Highly Secure Information Storage and Transmission. The project developed a new way of storing and encrypting information using DNA. The work was funded through Sandia’s internal Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. 

February 2, 2017
 

Organizations constantly are seeking new ways to address workload-specific storage demands in terms of performance and capacity while also meeting service-level agreements, response-time objectives and recovery-point objectives.

Many information technology operations are inspired by successful hyperscale organizations such as Facebook, Google and Amazon. However, most enterprises lack the scale and substantial development and operations commitment necessary to deploy software-defined storage infrastructure in the same ways. Hyperscale economics also typically don’t work out at smaller scale, resulting in poor utilization or unacceptable reliability issues.

January 1, 2017
By Stephanie Domas and Dr. Nancy McMillan

Advances in genomics, medical sensors and data-driven health care increasingly are enabling doctors and patients to make personalized and targeted care decisions. But the effectiveness of these precision medicine capabilities depends on critical cybersecurity components to protect patient privacy and the integrity of patient data.  

December 1, 2016
By George I. Seffers
A U.S. Marine Corps corporal fires a GAU-17/A gun during a Valiant Shield exercise over Farallon de Medinilla, Northern Mariana Islands. Machine-learning software may help predict which warfighters will be best suited for specific missions.

Researchers are developing an open source machine-learning framework that allows a distributed network of computers to process vast amounts of data as efficiently and effectively as supercomputers and to better predict behaviors or relationships. The technology has a broad range of potential applications, including commercial, medical and military uses.

Anyone who needs to analyze a few trillion datasets can use a supercomputer or distribute the problem among processors on a large network. The former option is not widely available, and the latter can be complicated. 

November 29, 2016
 

The Kill Chain Integration Branch at Hanscom Air Force Base has begun an experimentation campaign, known as Data-to-Decisions, to look at ways to provide warfighters data in the fastest and most efficient way possible. The campaign is in its early stages but, according to officials, already showing the potential for favorable results.

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