Joint Warfighting 2011

May 11, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Being successful in the era of irregular warfare will require a focus on new ways of building and preparing the force, according to a panel of military and civilian experts. Speaking at the 2011 Joint Warfighting Conference, the Wednesday panelists emphasized training and education using innovative approaches to build a force capable of winning in a rapidly changing arena. Brig. Gen. John W. Bullard Jr., USMC, prospective deputy commanding general, Marine Corps Combat Development Command, declared that the key to the future will be education-however, there is no silver bullet. The military must invest in officers and senior enlisted personnel both in training and education.

May 11, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

New technologies that are under development may not appear without hard decisions that must be made in a time of fiscal uncertainty, according to experts on a 2011 Joint Warfighting Conference panel. These decisions must take into account funding for the defensive technologies as well as changes in the force makeup that could remove missile defense deployment options. Vice Adm. Peter H. Daly, USN, deputy commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, noted that the Aegis ballistic missile defense system is being fielded on a multimission ship-not buttonholed on a mission-specific platform. The versatility of the system has led to its being deployed to Romania, he noted. Building on that, Rear Adm. Joseph A. Horn Jr.

May 11, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The most advanced military in the world must prepare for a future in which enemy technologies and capabilities negate existing advances, according to Michael W. Wynne, former secretary of the air force. These advances, which comprise both kinetic and digital capabilities, threaten land, sea and air forces in areas where they currently dominate. Existing communications and network systems are especially vulnerable, and not just because of direct action. Speaking at 2011 Joint Warfighting Conference, Wynne pointed out that software and data flow offer their own problems. Networks are drowning in gigabytes of data-"we are burying our transmission systems in irrelevant imagery," he said.

May 12, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Leaders today are being called upon to shape the future in a very different budget environment than ever before, and this will have an impact on the Navy and all services. The challenge, according to Adm. Gary Roughead, USN, Chief of Naval Operations, is that none of us has ever had to lead in this environment. "We are in uncharted territory," he explained at the AFCEA/USNI Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach, Virginia. And we must lead without any examples to look back upon, he added. The path ahead is to determine how we see the future unfolding and what we want the forces to do, the admiral recommended. From that, the leaders then can make the hard decisions.

May 11, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The word cyber is frequently discussed, but depending on perspective, the definition varies. On a panel led by LtGen. Jeffrey A. Sorenson, USA (Ret.), former Chief Information Officer/G-6, Department of the Army, experts from different perspectives came together to discuss cyber in support of the warfighter. There was agreement across the panel that the domain of cyberspace is big and man-made, as BGen. Joseph A. Brendler, USA, Chief of Staff, Defense Information Systems Agency, suggests, but RAdm. Edward H. Deets III, USN, Commander, Naval Network Warfare Command, adds that the cyber domain allows "good guys and bad guys to operate side by side." Cyber, he says, makes it difficult to distinguish between the two.

May 12, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Defense is being underfunded by between 20 and 40 precent across Europe. This is an incredible reduction in defense spending, and frankly quite dangerous, said VAdm. Robert G. Cooling, Chief of Staff Allied Command Transportation at the AFCEA/USNI Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach, Virginia. In this environment, we all need allies, even the United States. Fighting along with NATO is better than fighting ad hoc. Future operations need to be politically supportable, which means having the populace behind you, he explained. He notes that trust among nations is a two-way street, and the all of government approach is a force multiplier. In all situations, interoperability is critical, he maintains.

May 12, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The most brutal facts of current reality must be confronted, and that starts with the national debt where we are borrowing 40 cents on a dollar right now, said Raymond Haller, senior vice president and director of The MITRE Corporation's Department of Defense, Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence federally funded research and development center, speaking on a panel on budget issues at the AFCEA/USNI Joint Warfighting conference in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Haller suggests we are looking at a perfect storm right now with the $400 billion over 12 years in cuts being only a floor, with negotiations facing targets as high as $900 billion over 10 years.

May 10, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The United States and China are not likely to go to war with each other because neither country wants it and it would run counter to both nations' best interests. That was the conclusion of a plenary panel session hosted by former Good Morning America host David Hartman at the 2011 Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach. Adm. Timothy J. Keating, USN (Ret.), former head of the U.S. Pacific Command, noted that China actually wants the United States to remain active in the Asia-Pacific region as a hedge against any other country's adventurism. And, most of the other countries in that region want the United States to remain active as a hedge against China. Among areas of concern for China is North Korea.

May 11, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The fiscal crisis in the United States is its primary security threat today, explained Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, USA, commander, Joint Forces Command at the AFCEA and USNI Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach. The previous decade was one of military expansion, but the next one will be a decade of contraction, he warned. But the most important thing is that "we do not get caught in the trap of doing more with less. There are still redundancies, and we have to figure out how much we need to eliminate them," he explained, but he says this needs to be done carefully within a process.

May 10, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The United States must maintain a strong military, economic and political presence in the Asia-Pacific region for the foreseeable future, according to experts in a plenary panel session hosted by former Good Morning America host David Hartman at the 2011 Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach. This is necessary to counterbalance increasing Chinese influence and to keep the United States' status as an honest security broker in the region. Wallace "Chip" Gregson, former assistant secretary of Defense for Asian and Pacific Security Affairs, said that U.S. friends in the region want the United States to represent its values peacefully.

May 11, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The United States faces increased threats from abroad that could negate is superiority in many key military disciplines unless it re-dedicates itself to investment in progress, according to a former Defense Department official. Michael W. Wynne, former secretary of the air force, warned a Joint Warfighting Conference 2011 that the United States is dropping its guard in equipping the force for future conflict. "We have been lulled into a sort of lethargy by doing what we should be doing-exploiting the concept of total air dominance," Wynne said in using the Air Force as an example to discuss the challenge. Potential enemies are moving ahead with efforts to negate the U.S.

May 10, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The fog of war is transparent compared to the opacity of emergency humanitarian operations, according to a panel of experts with recent disaster response relief. Each operation is different, and the players-foreign governments, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), rescue forces and the suffering populace-contribute to difficult circumstances complicated by existing conditions. Many participants in disaster relief are well-meaning players, but their efforts are hindered by complications that arise as their efforts ramp up. In a Joint Warfighting Conference 2011 panel moderated by Dr.

May 10, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Future adversaries are likely to wage new types of warfare against U.S. and coalition forces based on varying types of conflict, according to a panel of experts at Joint Warfighting Conference 2011 in Virginia Beach, Virginia. "I worry about disruptive threats such as cyber and EW [electronic warfare]," said Lt. Gen. William J. Rew, USAF, vice commander, Air Combat Command. Gen. Rew expressed concern that the young people who've grown up always having the global positioning system GPS may be ill-equipped to handle warfare with those high-technology capabilities are denied.

May 10, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. armed services must plan around sustaining their core competencies to ensure future joint operations, said the commander of the U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Adm. John T. Harvey, USN, warned the Tuesday luncheon audience at the 2011 Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach that each service must refocus to ensure that they can contributed effectively to future joint operations. No one can predict what the future holds, as too many changes are taking place in the political and natural world. "Profound uncertainty with violent a rate of change is the salient characteristic of the age in which we live," the admiral declared.

May 10, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Ships and submarines being built by the U.S. Navy today will be in service 40 to 50 years from now, according to the commander of the U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Adm. John T. Harvey, USN, explained that the Navy cannot afford to re-procure its fleet, so it must ensure that its platforms last for several decades. "The years of plenty are over," Adm. Harvey said. "We can expect less resources in the future, more fiscal uncertainty." Speaking at Joint Warfighting Conference 2011 in Virginia Beach, the admiral warned that the sea service has been operating at too high a tempo to sustain forces that it cannot replace easily. Since 2006, Navy ships and submarines have been operating at a major combat operations demand.

May 10, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Pirates operating of the coast of Somalia are expanding both their reach and their profit motive, said Adm. John T. Harvey, USN, commander of the U.S. Fleet Forces Command. They have become more ruthless and now may be helping to fund terrorism. Speaking at the 2011 Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach, Adm. Harvey noted that terrorism and piracy have come together along the coasts of Africa and into the Indian Ocean. "These pirates are getting more sophisticated and more violent," he said, noting that they now demand higher ransoms and often kill their hostages anyway. "It is now a big business." Piracy is getting bigger and is going to continue to grow, he added. Fortunately, for the United States the effect is small.

May 10, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The muscle of Joint Forces Command is not going away, only the overweight organization and its budget that grew fourfold since it was established, said RAdm. Ted Carter, USN, Commander, Joint Enabling Capabilities Command. Joint Forces Command was established to be the Joint Force provider, Joint Force integrator and Joint Force trainer, but as it grew it never had a chance to right size itself either financially or workforce-wise, he explained. Participating in an Engagement Theater presentation at the 2011 Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach, Virginia, the admiral spoke positively of the smaller, more elite and adaptable force that will evolve from this change.

May 10, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Malicious threats in cyberspace are entering a new territory that is more menacing than previously experienced, according to the deputy commander of the U.S. Cyber Command. Lt. Gen. Robert E. Schmidle, USMC, told the kickoff address audience at the Joint Warfighting Conference 2011 in Virginia Beach, Virginia, that cyberspace is seeing the beginnings of the development of new types of destructive tools. These tools are software that has no purpose other than the destruction of other software or even hardware, he explained. As an example of the potential for this type of damage, the general cited an accident that occurred recently at a Russian power plant.

May 10, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

Cyberspace security experts no longer can afford the luxury of traditional security that detects malicious operations when they begin, said Lt. Gen. Robert E. Schmidle, USMC, deputy commander of the U.S. Cyber Command. This active approach must be extended across the civilian realm of cyberspace as well as in the military arena, he said. "You can't have static defense where you wait for something to happen," the general declared at the Joint Warfighting Conference 2011. "You've got to be out in the network hunting for malware." One approach is an agile tipping and cueing capability similar to that employed in signals intelligence (SIGINT).

May 10, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The 9/11 attacks and subsequent combat operations have spawned significant changes in military structure and operations, said a panel of experts at Joint Warfighting Conference 2011 in Virginia Beach, Virginia. These changes are still evolving, and more probably lie ahead in the near future. One of these big changes involves lessons gleaned from small unit operations. Lt. Gen. Robert L. Caslen Jr., USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth, stated that the past nine years have compelled the military to learn how to push capacity to the tactical edge where these units are located. Much has been learned, but more remains to be learned. Lt. Gen. William J.

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