Energy

March 1, 2013
By Max Cacas

Significant fuel savings and operational efficiencies are some of the benefits of an intelligent power management system that includes multiple energy sources.

The U.S. Army has tested a proof of concept for a smart electrical grid that would support tactical operations in the field. The concept, which was tested last summer, could save potentially billions of dollars in fuel use at remote forward positions. By eliminating the need to transport fuel for generators at such encampments, the new Tactical Operations Smart Grid also carries with it the potential of saving the lives of warfighters.

November 29, 2012
By Max Cacas

The report on the power transmission system was delayed by government officials for security reasons.

July 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

May 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Nellis Air Force Base, just outside of Las Vegas, Nevada, hosts the largest solar array on any U.S. military facility. It is capable of generating 14.2 megawatts of electricity.

Hurdles exist to harnessing the sun, but bright spots still can be found.

April 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

The transportable plasma waste-to-energy system in place at Hurlburt Field, Florida, has proven the effectiveness of the gasification concept for eliminating municipal waste. Airmen are conducting additional tests with the system, which could offer solutions for military and civilian waste management.

April 1, 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Solar panels provide electricity to the firing system of an M777A2 lightweight howitzer during tests of the SPACES system at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California.

Marines’ next-generation technology removes the need for risky energy supply lines.

April 2012
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

 

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) scientist Keith Emery examines a Semprius solar module at the laboratory’s Outdoor Test Facility. The NREL helped Semprius characterize and test its tiny solar cells, which have the diameter of a dot made by a ballpoint pen.

April 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

April 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
Sandia National Laboratories researcher Todd Lane withdraws a sample for analysis from a large culture of microalgae used to produce biodiesel.
Common aquatic plants offer economies of scale without affecting competition for food, land resources.

March 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

New photovoltaic technology promises embedded power for handheld systems.

Warfighters soon may turn to the sun to recharge their battlefield electronics. The U.S government is developing highly efficient solar cells that will be built into batteries and tactical equipment such as night vision goggles, personal navigation devices and radios. The effort seeks to cut the number of spare batteries carried by soldiers to save weight and reduce logistics requirements.

March 2007
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The U.S. Army’s Electronic Data Manager enables members of an aircrew to plan missions and react to mission changes in flight. These devices require power sources that are lightweight and long lasting. More than 1,000 of the systems have been fielded in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Service searches for longer lasting, lightweight batteries to energize the force.

February 2007
By Rita Boland

 
The military is determining ways to reduce its dependence on foreign oil by developing alternative energy sources. The United States gets much
of its energy from unstable regions
of the world.
U.S. military branches can lead the way in conservation practices and alternative technologies.

February 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
 
The U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force is testing Transportable Hybrid Electric Power System units, or THEPS, for possible deployment to Iraq. These units generate power from renewable sources such as wind and solar power.
The department thinks globally, acts globally.

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