INSS 2016

November 1, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
The rapid evolution of technology complicates analysts’ work in gauging how developments will affect national security, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper says at the Intelligence & National Security Summit.

The United States has strengthened its homeland security in the 15 years since terrorists attacked the nation, and significant work to reform the intelligence community means the critical agencies now communicate better with each other than ever before. Yet the world remains a perilous place, and security likely will worsen in the near future. U.S.

September 8, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Directors of the 'Big 6' in the U.S. intelligence community speak during the third annual Intelligence and National Security Summit in Washington, D.C.

The recurring theme throughout the premier intelligence summit in the nation’s capital this week was a parade of nations: The United States is worried about enduring threats posed by Russia, China and North Korea. Sprinkled into the mounting global risk landscape is the drawn-out strife against terrorism—with no near-term end—and the escalating vulnerabilities of the cyber realm.

The presentations offered a realistic snapshot of global turmoil today, bordering on a lot of doom and gloom.

Intelligence officials touched on a wide variety of issues during the two-day Intelligence & National Security Summit (INSS), held September 7 and 8.

September 7, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Panelists discuss the new face of terrorism during the 3rd annual INSS in Washington, D.C. this week.

The complexity of counterterrorism efforts and information sharing in the United States dwarfs the challenges besetting European governments as the continent contends with penetrable borders, an influx of refugees and the radicalization of some of its youth.

The rise in turmoil not only threatens the existence of the Schengen area, in which 26 countries abolished the need for passports to cross mutual borders, but complicates intelligence efforts to combat terror, said Michael Leiter, chief operations officer at Leidos, a panelist at the third annual Intelligence & National Security Summit (INSS) in Washington, D.C. this week.

September 7, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Director of National Intelligence James Clapper speaks at the Intelligence & National Security Summit. Photo by Herman Farrer Photography

Cybersecurity will remain as much of a challenge for the next administration as it has been for the current White House, especially in light of the constant barrage of cyber attacks from nation states, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said Wednesday.

“The Russians hack our systems all the time, not just government but corporate and personal systems,” Clapper said on the inaugural day of at the Intelligence & National Security Summit (INSS) in Washington, D.C. The two-day conference, sponsored by AFCEA International and the Intelligence and National Security Alliance (INSA), runs through Thursday.