INSS 2017

November 1, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Adm. Michael Rogers, USN, who heads both the National Security Agency (NSA) and U.S. Cyber Command, explains during a September presentation at the Intelligence and National Security Summit in Washington, D.C., why the NSA needs the authority to collect data on non-U.S. citizens who are on foreign soil.

Global changes are sparking a rash of new threats and challenges for intelligence agencies in the United States and abroad.

Terrorist groups continually innovate and adapt. In some ways, their tools and tactics are more sophisticated than ever—using social media to inspire violence, for example. In other ways, their methods are more rudimentary. They have simplified their efforts to include running over people in crowds with cars and slashing bystanders with knives.

U.S. and international intelligence officials described a variety of fresh risks and complications at September’s Intelligence and National Security Summit in Washington, D.C.

September 7, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Intelligence experts from around the world discuss countererrorism during the Intelligence and National Security Summit.

A panel of security and counterterrorism experts from four countries—Canada, Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States—shared insights into the ability of terrorist groups to use a variety of technologies, including the Internet, bomb-dropping unmanned vehicles, bioterrorism and artificial intelligence, to wield destruction around the world.

The experts shared their comments during a presentation at the 2017 Intelligence and National Security Summit in Washington, D.C.

September 7, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Panelists discuss section 702 Intelligence reauthorization during the Intelligence and National Security Summit.

Officials from across the U.S. intelligence community are calling for reauthorization of section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which allows the government to collect data on non-U.S. citizens on foreign soil, as Congress debates whether to reauthorize, reform or outright reject it.

Multiple officials from multiple agencies touted the benefits of Section 702 during the 2017 Intelligence and National Security Summit, which was held Sept. 6-7 in Washington, D.C.

September 7, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) speaks during the Intelligence and National Security Summit.

The U.S. federal government has not yet told state-level election officials whether their election systems were hacked by the Russians.

September 6, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Panelists discuss military intelligence at the Intelligence and National Security Summit.

While space has always been an important domain for military intelligence, the intelligence community is renewing its emphasis on the stars, according to officials speaking at the Intelligence and National Security Summit in Washington, D.C.

“One of the reasons this conversation is taking place is because of the evolving threat environment. We realize, as much as we thought we appreciated the role of space historically, it’s become even more critical, both from a warfighting perspective and from an economic perspective,” said Maj. Gen. James Marrs, USAF, Air Force assistant deputy chief of staff for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.

September 6, 2017
By George I. Seffers
Tom Bossert, assistant to the president for homeland security and counterterrorism, speaks at the 2017 Intelligence and National Security Summit.

A cyber strike may not be the most effective deterrent against adversaries, Tom Bossert, assistant to the president for homeland security and counterterrorism, National Security Council, told the audience at the 2017 Intelligence and National Security Summit in Washington, D.C.

If a “bad actor” is engaging in increasingly unacceptable behavior, he said, “I think what we’ll have to do is punch him in a way that’s real-world and not cyber-world.” Deterrent actions will be “commensurate with the expense” and also will be done in such a way that it will not “create a long-term escalatory posture.”